[BYT MANIFESTO] Iskusstvo bytovoi veshchi [i.e. The Art of The Everyday Object]. David Arkin.
[BYT MANIFESTO] Iskusstvo bytovoi veshchi [i.e. The Art of The Everyday Object]
[BYT MANIFESTO] Iskusstvo bytovoi veshchi [i.e. The Art of The Everyday Object]
[BYT MANIFESTO] Iskusstvo bytovoi veshchi [i.e. The Art of The Everyday Object]
[BYT MANIFESTO] Iskusstvo bytovoi veshchi [i.e. The Art of The Everyday Object]

[BYT MANIFESTO] Iskusstvo bytovoi veshchi [i.e. The Art of The Everyday Object]

Moscow: Izogiz, 1932. Item #1011

170, [3] pp. 21x15 cm. Original photomontage wrappers. Very good, spine is restored. Ex-library copy (the stamp ‘allowed for resale’ of Russian Public Historic Library). Original wrappers’ design by Solomon Telingater (1903-1969), in the composition included the pieces of furniture, drawings of children, abstract architectural elements, pieces of fabrics and tableware.
Illustrated throughout. The illustrations include the designs of a room by El Lissitzky, a working club room designed by A. Rodchenko, as well as a stage costume designed by him, examples of textile and agitational porcelain.
First and only edition. Very rare. This work, produced by art historian, the head of the department of industrial design of Moscow University David Arkin (1899-1957), was his debut work but also one of the most interesting ones. Written by him under the influence of Bauhaus, Le Corbusier and productive arts of the USSR of the 1920s, it could be seen as a kind of manifesto of left art in the design of furniture, tableware and everyday objects.
Arkin makes the argument that in a harmonious co-existence of the machine-produced items and the artist the crucial ‘sight point’ is the everyday object. He understands it as any item that surrounds a person in his daily life from furniture to tableware as well as clothing and anything inside man’s house. All of these objects are analyzed in the book from the perspectives of the ‘new style’ and with many references to the achievements of the European designers.
In the chapter ‘From William Morris to Constructivism’ Arkin tries to prove that only Soviet design has the advantage of creating the most universal and advanced style. It’s achieved because of the belief that art is the function of everyday life and is serving the everyday life and its objects.
Arkin’s work is enjoyable because in the following year the wind has changed and under the accusations of formalism a lot of ideas he was promoting was discharged and disallowed in USSR.
David Arkin went on to focus on the books on architecture, with his classical ‘Contemporary Architecture of the West’ coming out the same year (El Lissitzky designed the book).

Worldcat shows copies at Stanford and Columbia Universities.

Status: On Hold
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