[LIBERALIZATION OF WOMEN IN EASTERN REPUBLICS] Oktiabr’ i zhenshchina Vostoka [i.e. The October and a Woman of the East]. A. Nukhrat.
[LIBERALIZATION OF WOMEN IN EASTERN REPUBLICS] Oktiabr’ i zhenshchina Vostoka [i.e. The October and a Woman of the East]
[LIBERALIZATION OF WOMEN IN EASTERN REPUBLICS] Oktiabr’ i zhenshchina Vostoka [i.e. The October and a Woman of the East]
[LIBERALIZATION OF WOMEN IN EASTERN REPUBLICS] Oktiabr’ i zhenshchina Vostoka [i.e. The October and a Woman of the East]

[LIBERALIZATION OF WOMEN IN EASTERN REPUBLICS] Oktiabr’ i zhenshchina Vostoka [i.e. The October and a Woman of the East]

Moscow: Partizdat, 1932. Item #1075

56 pp.: ill. 20x13,5 cm. In original illustrated wrappers. Very good, some foxing, red pencil marks.
Second edition. Constructivist cover design features three pictures of socialist women: without veils, working and smiling.
The book outlines socialist methods to improve the everyday life of Oriental women and summarizes what women’s organizations achieved for 15 years in the Soviet Republics. It was written by initiator of Chuvash women movement and journalist, Antonina Nurkhat (1900-1983). In contrast to the first edition (1927), Nukhrat included events and data of the first 5-year plan. The photographs depict Central Asian women at factory, party meeting, train carriage, in nursery, consulting center and public feast.
Storming the old way of life and oppression of Eastern women required a special approach. In Bukhara, activists of Soviet women’s offices, wearing a veil or burqa and carrying gifts, visited women for a little chat during tea drinking when men were absent. Socialist women’s institutions were established, including female cooperative shops and women’s clubs - men weren’t allowed to enter there.
The promotion of equal education and work, politician activity and social life was supervised by the Communist party. In the early 1920s, Soviet laws were passed against bride-kidnapping, polygamy and child marriage. A competition of cultural changes was held between Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan, the State of Buryat-Mongolia and Oirat region. During the first five-year plan, 3 million women were involved in industrial development throughout the USSR.
One of the North Caucasian campaigns declared: “Coat for a Mountain Woman!”. Traditionally, local women and girls had no outer garment for cold weather. It prevented them from taking part in public activities, work and school classes, provoked various diseases. In 1928, the local Soviet organizations issued a statement against this tradition, undertook supply coats to schoolgirls, female workers and peasants.
The most exciting day in the history of liberalization of Central Asian woman was March 8, 1927 when Uzbek and Turkic women came to public square in Samarkand, threw out and burned veils and chachvans. By the early 1928, this campaign was widespread and attracted thousands of women.

According to Worldcat, the only paper copy is located in Texas Universities.

Price: $950.00

Status: On Hold
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