[CONSTRUCTIVIST KIEV ARCHITECTURE] Budova sotsiialistychnogo Kieva [i.e. Architecture of Socialist Kiev]
[CONSTRUCTIVIST KIEV ARCHITECTURE] Budova sotsiialistychnogo Kieva [i.e. Architecture of Socialist Kiev]
[CONSTRUCTIVIST KIEV ARCHITECTURE] Budova sotsiialistychnogo Kieva [i.e. Architecture of Socialist Kiev]
[CONSTRUCTIVIST KIEV ARCHITECTURE] Budova sotsiialistychnogo Kieva [i.e. Architecture of Socialist Kiev]
[CONSTRUCTIVIST KIEV ARCHITECTURE] Budova sotsiialistychnogo Kieva [i.e. Architecture of Socialist Kiev]
[CONSTRUCTIVIST KIEV ARCHITECTURE] Budova sotsiialistychnogo Kieva [i.e. Architecture of Socialist Kiev]
[CONSTRUCTIVIST KIEV ARCHITECTURE] Budova sotsiialistychnogo Kieva [i.e. Architecture of Socialist Kiev]

[CONSTRUCTIVIST KIEV ARCHITECTURE] Budova sotsiialistychnogo Kieva [i.e. Architecture of Socialist Kiev]

Kiev: Vidannia Kievs’koi mis’kradi, 1932. Item #1081

[2], 168 pp. 21,5x30,5 cm. In original illustrated cardboards; photomontage endpapers. Covers restored, some soiling occasionally, otherwise very good.
First and only edition. One of 1200 copies.
Constructivist mock-up was produced by V. Adrievich, M. Babat, Ia. Daneliak, E. Timoshkin. Photographs were provided by F. Petrov, one of the photographs is placed on the front cover as well.
This striking album features 150 model structures built in the early Soviet period. Among them are power stations, factories, farms, large-scale bakeries, railway stations, movie theaters and studios, libraries, children’s sanatoriums, institutes, living buildings and student dormitories. The main focus of the edition was on projects and photographs of these structures. Their characteristics were published occasionally, together with constructivist-styled object names.
It is an evidence of initial architectural decisions regarding the key Kiev buildings of the first Soviet decade. The Kiev district power station (1930) was one of the first large industrial sites of the city. It was projected by Mikhail Parusnikov (1893-1968) who studied at VKhUTEMAS under I. Zholtovsky and favored constructivism until the first clouds hung over this style in the early 1930s.
The film studio of All-Ukrainian Photo and Cinema Administration (VUFKU) was designed by Valerian Rykov (1874-1942) and built in 1926–1928. The whole complex of buildings was finished and included industrial and living constructions. Separately, Rykov projected another essential structure, the first Kiev movie theater that was opened in 1931 and was regarded as “a laboratory of proletarian culture”. The Jewish Theatre became a symbol of style change. The book features the first variant of the design accepted in 1932, later the project was re-designed.
Being the third largest city of the USSR, Kiev became the capital of the Ukrainian SSR in 2 years after this book was published. It would be built further under new orders of Communist authority and other styles would dominate in architecture.

Not found in Worldcat.

Sold