[WARTIME: RED CROSS] Pervaia meditsinskaia pomoshch’: Al’bom iz 40 tablits [i.e. First Medical Aid: Album of 40 Tables] / compiled by V. Oznobishchev, S. Speranskaia
[WARTIME: RED CROSS] Pervaia meditsinskaia pomoshch’: Al’bom iz 40 tablits [i.e. First Medical Aid: Album of 40 Tables] / compiled by V. Oznobishchev, S. Speranskaia
[WARTIME: RED CROSS] Pervaia meditsinskaia pomoshch’: Al’bom iz 40 tablits [i.e. First Medical Aid: Album of 40 Tables] / compiled by V. Oznobishchev, S. Speranskaia
[WARTIME: RED CROSS] Pervaia meditsinskaia pomoshch’: Al’bom iz 40 tablits [i.e. First Medical Aid: Album of 40 Tables] / compiled by V. Oznobishchev, S. Speranskaia

[WARTIME: RED CROSS] Pervaia meditsinskaia pomoshch’: Al’bom iz 40 tablits [i.e. First Medical Aid: Album of 40 Tables] / compiled by V. Oznobishchev, S. Speranskaia

Item #1298

Moscow: Moskovskii rabochii, 1941. 42 pp.: ill. 22x30 cm. In the original illustrated folder. Folder slightly rubbed, edges of t.p. bumped, otherwise near fine.
Extremely rare as a well-printed wartime edition in this condition. The album was signed for printing on August 13, 1941. It had come out just before the Battle of Moscow started.
The edition was compiled by Viktor Oznobishchev (1887-?), who wrote almost 20 works on medical aid in 1938-1945, together with Sofya Speranskaya, the author of manuals for Soviet nurses of the Red Cross. This guide was also released under supervision of the Moscow Red Cross.
During the wartime period, numerous brochures and books explained how to provide basic medical care to someone experiencing various injuries. This guide was printed in the very beginning of the war and contains detailed and colorful illustrations. Tables feature common instructions on how to stop bleeding, bandaging, etc., but also how to carry a wounded soldier on a stretcher, to carry him/her on four hands (often this was done by two nurses). Last tables demonstrated how to help soldiers affected by various chemical weapons, for example, to extinguish burning phosphorus on the skin. The guide also shows a Soviet individual bandaging set spread during the Great Patriotic war.

The only copy is located in the National Library of Medicine.

Sold