Item #1419 [1960S FASHION] Al’bom modelei odezhdy s chertezhami kroia [i.e. Album of Clothing Models with Sewing Patterns] / Issue 3 for 1965
[1960S FASHION] Al’bom modelei odezhdy s chertezhami kroia [i.e. Album of Clothing Models with Sewing Patterns] / Issue 3 for 1965
[1960S FASHION] Al’bom modelei odezhdy s chertezhami kroia [i.e. Album of Clothing Models with Sewing Patterns] / Issue 3 for 1965
[1960S FASHION] Al’bom modelei odezhdy s chertezhami kroia [i.e. Album of Clothing Models with Sewing Patterns] / Issue 3 for 1965

[1960S FASHION] Al’bom modelei odezhdy s chertezhami kroia [i.e. Album of Clothing Models with Sewing Patterns] / Issue 3 for 1965

Leningrad: Leningradskii dom modelei Upr. Shveinoi promyshlennosti Lensovnarkhoza, 1965. Item #1419

24 pp.: ill. 22x32 cm. In original illustrated wrappers. Slightly rubbed and bumped, a light stain on the lower margin throughout the copy, otherwise very good.

Edited by V. Kaminskaia.
An issue of a periodical about sewing patterns of the 1960s Soviet fashion. The edition was printed by the Leningrad House of Models (LDMO) in 1960-1967.
In April 1944, two months after the end of the siege of Leningrad, the first House of Fashion Models opened on Nevsky Prospect and was active for 50 years as an experimental design bureau. By August 1948, various Houses of Models operated in Moscow, Leningrad, Kyiv, Minsk, and Riga. Soon, there were 34 Houses of Models in the USSR and among them, the LDMO took an honorable second place (after the Moscow All-Union House of Models).
In the aftermath of objective post-war hardships (outdated and worn-out equipment, lack of qualified personnel and fabrics), many factories abandoned the exquisite designs of fashion houses and gave preference to the production of the simplest clothes. During wartime, employees frequently changed at garment factories, and their general qualification level dropped. The maximum unification of operations, as was the case with military uniforms, didn’t contribute to the development of creative skills. Many young workers were accustomed to sewing the same gray overcoat or military tunic from month to month. They had absolutely no experience in tailoring much more complex to manufacture, diverse in style, requiring knowledge of more operations, and, finally, constantly updated civilian clothing. Creative departments of garment factories that arose in the 1930s were liquidated or reduced during wartime. Targets of the post-war five-year plan were oriented primarily towards the fulfillment of quantitative indicators and made the situation even worse.
To promote its activities, the House of Models held regular fashion shows in its own showroom, accompanied by explanations from art critics about the trends of contemporary fashion. Shows of clothing collections by talented LDMO designers were demonstrated both in large cities and small towns. The House of Models organized trips to Japan, Canada, Belgium, Germany, the Czech Republic, etc. The 1960s witnessed the beginning of the “golden age” of the Leningrad House of Models. At that time, the Leningrad House of Models started publishing an illustrated review and various magazines. A text ad with prices of these printed matters is placed on the rear side of the back cover. The front cover features instructions for applying patterns.
This edition includes sewing patterns for 22 models of clothes created by 12 female designers: N. Gogoleva, E. Zhukova, N. Pashkovskaia, E. Preobrazhenskaia, P. Silverstova, E. Kudriavtseva, G. Svetlichnaia, L. Pol’-Mari, etc. As in other fashion magazines, each clothing model is shown on a woman drawn next to the sector of sewing patterns. Each illustration is accompanied by a caption indicating the model number, designer’s name, general description, and details about height and size.

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Status: On Hold
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