Item #1807 [SOCIALIST CONSTRUCTION THROUGH CAMERA LENS] Stroim [i.e. We Are Building] June for 1930, #23/24, 61/62 for 1931, 34/35 for 1933, #2, 8, 9/10 for 1937. Overall 7 issues
[SOCIALIST CONSTRUCTION THROUGH CAMERA LENS] Stroim [i.e. We Are Building] June for 1930, #23/24, 61/62 for 1931, 34/35 for 1933, #2, 8, 9/10 for 1937. Overall 7 issues
[SOCIALIST CONSTRUCTION THROUGH CAMERA LENS] Stroim [i.e. We Are Building] June for 1930, #23/24, 61/62 for 1931, 34/35 for 1933, #2, 8, 9/10 for 1937. Overall 7 issues
[SOCIALIST CONSTRUCTION THROUGH CAMERA LENS] Stroim [i.e. We Are Building] June for 1930, #23/24, 61/62 for 1931, 34/35 for 1933, #2, 8, 9/10 for 1937. Overall 7 issues
[SOCIALIST CONSTRUCTION THROUGH CAMERA LENS] Stroim [i.e. We Are Building] June for 1930, #23/24, 61/62 for 1931, 34/35 for 1933, #2, 8, 9/10 for 1937. Overall 7 issues
[SOCIALIST CONSTRUCTION THROUGH CAMERA LENS] Stroim [i.e. We Are Building] June for 1930, #23/24, 61/62 for 1931, 34/35 for 1933, #2, 8, 9/10 for 1937. Overall 7 issues
[SOCIALIST CONSTRUCTION THROUGH CAMERA LENS] Stroim [i.e. We Are Building] June for 1930, #23/24, 61/62 for 1931, 34/35 for 1933, #2, 8, 9/10 for 1937. Overall 7 issues
[SOCIALIST CONSTRUCTION THROUGH CAMERA LENS] Stroim [i.e. We Are Building] June for 1930, #23/24, 61/62 for 1931, 34/35 for 1933, #2, 8, 9/10 for 1937. Overall 7 issues
[SOCIALIST CONSTRUCTION THROUGH CAMERA LENS] Stroim [i.e. We Are Building] June for 1930, #23/24, 61/62 for 1931, 34/35 for 1933, #2, 8, 9/10 for 1937. Overall 7 issues
[SOCIALIST CONSTRUCTION THROUGH CAMERA LENS] Stroim [i.e. We Are Building] June for 1930, #23/24, 61/62 for 1931, 34/35 for 1933, #2, 8, 9/10 for 1937. Overall 7 issues
[SOCIALIST CONSTRUCTION THROUGH CAMERA LENS] Stroim [i.e. We Are Building] June for 1930, #23/24, 61/62 for 1931, 34/35 for 1933, #2, 8, 9/10 for 1937. Overall 7 issues
[SOCIALIST CONSTRUCTION THROUGH CAMERA LENS] Stroim [i.e. We Are Building] June for 1930, #23/24, 61/62 for 1931, 34/35 for 1933, #2, 8, 9/10 for 1937. Overall 7 issues
[SOCIALIST CONSTRUCTION THROUGH CAMERA LENS] Stroim [i.e. We Are Building] June for 1930, #23/24, 61/62 for 1931, 34/35 for 1933, #2, 8, 9/10 for 1937. Overall 7 issues
[SOCIALIST CONSTRUCTION THROUGH CAMERA LENS] Stroim [i.e. We Are Building] June for 1930, #23/24, 61/62 for 1931, 34/35 for 1933, #2, 8, 9/10 for 1937. Overall 7 issues
[SOCIALIST CONSTRUCTION THROUGH CAMERA LENS] Stroim [i.e. We Are Building] June for 1930, #23/24, 61/62 for 1931, 34/35 for 1933, #2, 8, 9/10 for 1937. Overall 7 issues
[SOCIALIST CONSTRUCTION THROUGH CAMERA LENS] Stroim [i.e. We Are Building] June for 1930, #23/24, 61/62 for 1931, 34/35 for 1933, #2, 8, 9/10 for 1937. Overall 7 issues
[SOCIALIST CONSTRUCTION THROUGH CAMERA LENS] Stroim [i.e. We Are Building] June for 1930, #23/24, 61/62 for 1931, 34/35 for 1933, #2, 8, 9/10 for 1937. Overall 7 issues
[SOCIALIST CONSTRUCTION THROUGH CAMERA LENS] Stroim [i.e. We Are Building] June for 1930, #23/24, 61/62 for 1931, 34/35 for 1933, #2, 8, 9/10 for 1937. Overall 7 issues
[SOCIALIST CONSTRUCTION THROUGH CAMERA LENS] Stroim [i.e. We Are Building] June for 1930, #23/24, 61/62 for 1931, 34/35 for 1933, #2, 8, 9/10 for 1937. Overall 7 issues
[SOCIALIST CONSTRUCTION THROUGH CAMERA LENS] Stroim [i.e. We Are Building] June for 1930, #23/24, 61/62 for 1931, 34/35 for 1933, #2, 8, 9/10 for 1937. Overall 7 issues
[SOCIALIST CONSTRUCTION THROUGH CAMERA LENS] Stroim [i.e. We Are Building] June for 1930, #23/24, 61/62 for 1931, 34/35 for 1933, #2, 8, 9/10 for 1937. Overall 7 issues
[SOCIALIST CONSTRUCTION THROUGH CAMERA LENS] Stroim [i.e. We Are Building] June for 1930, #23/24, 61/62 for 1931, 34/35 for 1933, #2, 8, 9/10 for 1937. Overall 7 issues

[SOCIALIST CONSTRUCTION THROUGH CAMERA LENS] Stroim [i.e. We Are Building] June for 1930, #23/24, 61/62 for 1931, 34/35 for 1933, #2, 8, 9/10 for 1937. Overall 7 issues

Item #1807

Moscow, 1930-1937. 47x33 cm. In original illustrated wrappers.
1930 – 16 pp.: ill. Small fragments of spine and covers, tears of edges restored, pale coloured water stains, some soiling, otherwise very good.
#23/23 (1931) – 8 pp.: ill. Spine restored, some soiling, otherwise very good.
#61/62 (1931) – 8 pp.: ill. Spine restored, otherwise very good.
#34/35 (1933) – 8 pp.: ill. Stains occasionally, tears of edges and spine, traces of spine restoration, otherwise very good.
#2 (1937) – 16 pp.: ill. Spine restored, with water stain along it, some stains on front cover, otherwise very good.
#8 (1937) – 16 pp.: ill. Horizontal crease throughout copy. Slightly rubbed, small tears of edges and spine, otherwise very good.
#9/10 (1937) – 24 pp.: ill. Spine restored, wrappers rubbed, some foxing, stains on spine and inner edge throughout the copy, otherwise very good.

A set of 7 large-format and opulently illustrated magazine issues of the 1930s. This propaganda periodical was published as a photo journal of the newspaper “Za industrializatsiiu” [For Industrialization] in 1929-1938.
The 1930 issue is profusely filled with photomontages related to socialist construction and its forced implementation. The design was created by poster designer Iosif Ganf (Yang; 1899-1973). In the 1920s, he collaborated with satirical magazines “Krokodil”, “Smekhach” and all-Union periodicals as “Pravda” and “Izvestia”. Since 1931, Ganf was engaged in designing political posters and editions of IZOGIZ publishing house.
The front cover design mixes photographs of smiling party officials, industrial buildings, a tractor and a turbine, with slogans. The back cover photomontage compares European workers demonstrating against unemployment to Moscow workers registered at a labor exchange. Double-page spreads gradually retell the progress of Soviet recovery of the country and industrialization: from the devastated land in the Civil War to flourishing construction of giant factories and the launched Turkestan–Siberia Railway. Among construction projects are DneproHES, the Selmash factory in Rostov, Stalingrad Tractor Factory, the Kerch Iron Works, etc. The issue contains an interesting photomontage about Soviet plans on hydroelectric power stations on the Angara river. The composition consists of a picture of taiga, a dim image of a power line above it and an abandoned village where the construction site would be placed. No power stations were built on Angara until the 1950s.
Covers of issue #23/24 (1931) feature the construction of DneproGES. Designs of both 1931 issues were created by Vladimir Shtranikh (1888-1981), Soviet graphic artist and stage designer. Since 1922, he lived in Moscow and gained fame as the author of works devoted to the navy. In the book design, Stranikh is known for collaboration with periodicals “Gazeta tekhnika” [Technician’s Newspaper] and “Stroim” [We Are Building] where he worked in photography, photomontage and type design showing notable constructivist solutions. Double-page spreads of No. 23/24 (1931) are devoted to Magnitostroi [Magnitogorsk Iron and Steel Works], Kuznetskstroi [Kuznetsk Metallurgy Complex] and achievements of these giant constructions.
Shtrakikh’s front cover design of No. 61/62 (1931) features a remarkable letterpress design and photographs of Kuznetskstroi by Erushevich. In the back cover design, Shtrakikh arranged pictures related to a new socialist canteen within the Trekhgorny factory in Moscow. One of the double-page spreads shows successes of Soviet aviation: pilots, an agricultural airplane, some passenger aircraft and a hydroplane, aerodromes in Moscow, Kharkiv and Dnepropetrovsk, a laboratory of airship development. There are interesting pages on Velostroi – construction of Moscow Bicycle Factory, radio inventions, sound cinematography, an oil field along the Emba river in Central Asia.
The major topic of No.34/35 is a Soviet FD class locomotive which was in production since late 1931. A picture of such a locomotive is added to the front cover design and four related pictures are published on p.3. This issue includes the original project of the Novosibirsk Theater of Opera and Ballet. Initially, it was supposed to be the House of Science and Culture built in a constructivist form. Started in 1931, the grandiose construction lasted until 1941, changing the architectural style in process.
The 1937 issues are designed by artist Alexander Zhitomirsky (1907-1993) who is mostly known for Cold War political propaganda photomontages. The issue No.2 for 1937 is fully dedicated to the memory of the father of Soviet heavy industry, Grigol (Sergo) Ordzhonikidze (1886-1937). It contains some notable photomontages where portraits of Ordzhonikidze are combined with industrial buildings and construction equipment. Zhitomirsky also placed a line of six Ordzhonikidze’s portraits from one series on central pages.
Issue No.8 for 1937 published photographs of Kamchatka by G. Lipskerov and V. Glass. They feature a Soviet shock-working fishing vessel, hydroplanes connecting Kamchatka fishing companies, the first Soviet female sea captain A. Shchetinina, harvest of local farmers and their livestock, bone carving masters and their granddaughters-pioneers. Also, the issue contains an article on Gorky Automobile Plant where a passenger model M-1 had been produced since 1936. The text is illustrated with a photomontage with this car. At the end, an impressive photomontage advertisement is printed for soup concentrates. There is also a nice advertisement for the Mogiz Bookstore No.1, illustrated with photographs. The back cover demonstrates a photomontage advertisement for the Second Draw of Winnings from the Second Five-Year Plan Loan held in Tbilisi.
The issue #9/10 for 1937 was created on the Moscow Volga Canal. Zhitomirsky co-worked on it together with A. Ivanov and used photographs provided by S. Boldyrev, A. Garanin, I. Efremov, G. Zel’m, F. Kislov, V. Kovrigin, N. Pechienko, N. Strunnikov. The issue starts with a canal scheme and photographs of party officials. Of them, N. Ezhov, M. Berman, V. Chubar and V. Mezhlauk were executed during the Purge. Other photographs feature canal structures, local landscapes, and steamships that made the earliest routes. Pictures of workers published were taken in factories releasing equipment. No photographs of Dmitlag prisoners were printed in this propaganda edition.
In all, a good collection of high-quality propaganda issues.

Paper copy of No.9/10 (1937) is located in Columbia University, some issues of 1930 and 1937 are located in LoC.

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