[ILLUSTRATING CHILDREN’S BOOKS] Printsipi ilustriruvannya dityzchoy knizhki [i.e. The Principles of Illustrating the Children’s Book]. B. Butnik-Siverskiy.
[ILLUSTRATING CHILDREN’S BOOKS] Printsipi ilustriruvannya dityzchoy knizhki [i.e. The Principles of Illustrating the Children’s Book].
[ILLUSTRATING CHILDREN’S BOOKS] Printsipi ilustriruvannya dityzchoy knizhki [i.e. The Principles of Illustrating the Children’s Book].
[ILLUSTRATING CHILDREN’S BOOKS] Printsipi ilustriruvannya dityzchoy knizhki [i.e. The Principles of Illustrating the Children’s Book].

[ILLUSTRATING CHILDREN’S BOOKS] Printsipi ilustriruvannya dityzchoy knizhki [i.e. The Principles of Illustrating the Children’s Book].

Kiev: Kul'tura, 1929. Item #188

68 pp., XII illustrations. In original illustrated wrappers. Fine, uncut, few tiny tears, owner’s signature on the p.4., occasional light foxing.

Extremely rare. One of 2000 copies.
Important manifesto of Ukrainian children’s books designers of 1920-30s. In Ukrainian. Summary in German.
In Ukraine in 1920-1930s there were three centers of the children’s book designers: Kharkiv, Odessa and Kiev. While in Kharkiv and Odessa most of the most important illustrators were the members or followers of Jewish Kultur-Lige of late 1910s, in Kiev a new radical school of illustrators emerged. Its roots ideologically go to OST group (Organization of Easel Painters) that was found in Moscow by Shterenberg and other VKHUTEMAS artists. Boris Stepanovich Butnik-Siversky (1901-1983) who graduated from Chernigov Art Academy reflected on their views and wrote this monograph that became the guidance for such young artists in Kiev as Gamburger, Zabila, Kryukov, Rachev. They all started to work in Kul'tura publishing house in the 1920s and their best-known works are from early 1930s. Butnik-Siversky and his followers were the artists of first Soviet generation – so the author don’t have any connections with pre-revolutionary art. Siversky’s authorities are revolutionary posters and OST artists of Moscow. He calls for flatness, expressive rhythm in the illustrations. Butnik-Siversky wanted to oppose the naturalism in children’s book illustration.

After the success of Kiev illustrating tradition some of the bigger names started to work in Moscow for GIZ.

Not in the Worldcat.

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