Item #1949 [DP PERIODICAL] Pu-Hu. Universal'nyi tyzhnevyi zhurnal [i.e. Pu-Hu. Universal weekly magazine]. Vol. Charnets'kyi.
[DP PERIODICAL] Pu-Hu. Universal'nyi tyzhnevyi zhurnal [i.e. Pu-Hu. Universal weekly magazine]
[DP PERIODICAL] Pu-Hu. Universal'nyi tyzhnevyi zhurnal [i.e. Pu-Hu. Universal weekly magazine]
[DP PERIODICAL] Pu-Hu. Universal'nyi tyzhnevyi zhurnal [i.e. Pu-Hu. Universal weekly magazine]
[DP PERIODICAL] Pu-Hu. Universal'nyi tyzhnevyi zhurnal [i.e. Pu-Hu. Universal weekly magazine]
[DP PERIODICAL] Pu-Hu. Universal'nyi tyzhnevyi zhurnal [i.e. Pu-Hu. Universal weekly magazine]
[DP PERIODICAL] Pu-Hu. Universal'nyi tyzhnevyi zhurnal [i.e. Pu-Hu. Universal weekly magazine]
[DP PERIODICAL] Pu-Hu. Universal'nyi tyzhnevyi zhurnal [i.e. Pu-Hu. Universal weekly magazine]

[DP PERIODICAL] Pu-Hu. Universal'nyi tyzhnevyi zhurnal [i.e. Pu-Hu. Universal weekly magazine]

Item #1949

Nos. 4, 5, 8, 12, 14-16, 18-20, 23, 26, 28-34, 40, 41 for 1947 and nos. 6, 8, 9, 13, 19 for 1948. (25 issues total). 16 p., ill. Augsburg: Verlag PU-HU, 1947-1948. Published under D.P. Publications license US-E-4, OMGB. Issues mostly in good condition. Some have detached covers. Faded paper. Tears to the front and back pages on some of the nos. No. 9 for 1948 lacks the central conjoining pages, no. 19 for 1947 lacks the last page, no. 23 from 1947 has only the front and last page survived, stapled with a page of another issue. No. 29 for 1947 lacks two pages. For no. 40 of 1947 only the front page is preserved, the rest of the issue is lacking. Most issues bearing I. and O. Chmoly personal library stamps.

“Pu-Hu” was a Zaporizhzhia cossack watchword imitating the cry of an owl. It was used to greet one another and the editor uses this word to greet those who understand the password. And those who understand were the readers of this edition, WWII displaced persons.
Displaced persons were literally people who were away from their homeland - mostly refugees and ex-concentration camps prisoners. The Allies managed to construct a network of DP camps on the controlled territories of Germany. Altogether, the camps held some 1.5 mln people and among those close to 200 000 Ukrainians. There were 125 camps with Ukrainians, 80 of them being fully Ukrainian and some of the Ukrainians lived in mixed camps together with other Eastern Europeans. The operations were run by the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRRA) and the camps were functioning till late 1950’s.
People lived in camps for years and each camp housed several thousand people. Thus, camps had active social, cultural and even political life. Camp administration organised all what the society could offer: primary schools and secondary education, theatres, choirs, workshops, professional courses, businesses. And of course, publishing activities were started as early as the first camps were organised.
First two newspapers were Nashe zhyttia and Chas, both issued as early as Autumn 1945. During the first two years the DP periodical was pure legal chaos but from 1947 new rules were introduced by the military administration. All the publisher’s work was controlled by Allied military officials, thus magazines had to get special permission to be issued. In most cases that was just a formality as long as the periodical had a firm loyal Allied position. It is known that under new rules, 40 periodicals were registered across all DP camps, of them 10 Ukrainian. Pu-Hu was one of those 10, with the license number US-E-4 as stated in each issue.
Pu-Hu is a reflection of what is known as “the Golden age of DP press”, a short period from 1947 to 1948. There were several factors contributing to the boom. From 1947 there was already an understandable legal framework on how to publish, to sell the magazines, pay taxes and to be at least a self-sustainable enterprise. Also, after a period of shortage of Cyrillic publishing machines, new technology became available, making a better quality printing process an option. Moreover, there were still a lot of readers in the camps (later most of them moved to live either to the US or to a particular European country), so there was a considerable market for periodicals.
And finally, after the first hectic months and years, the life in camps was more or less settled. People were interested to get back to their occupation - including the press professionals and writers. Thus, the union of Ukrainian journalists was active, people were eager to create, write, publish. With the golden age, the DP press was thriving. The total number of Ukrainian DP periodicals known today from the 1945-1950’s era being 327. Some were special bulletins issued by camp administration. Thematic bulletins, student press, woman magazines, Esperanto publications - a variety of periodicals were being published. And compared to such, Pu-Hu should be considered a mainstream media.
Pu-Hu was issued in Somme-Kaserne camp of Augsburg, a key place for the DP era of Ukrainian culture. Somme-Kaserne housed at least 6000 Ukrainians. The camp network housed a whole Ukrainian museum, 3 churches, 14 different organisations, some political parties’ HQ, theatres, 2 choirs and even a ballet group. It was also a place of regular meetings and conferences, including scientific and political ones. News on some of them are featured in Pu-Hu that was.
Pu-Hu was issued in 1947-1949, some sources state that it was also issued as a monthly in 1954. And we can only guess the circulation of Pu-Hu. The most popular newspapers from 1947-48 had a circulation of up to 10-15 000 copies. Pu-Hu was a weekly, heavily illustrated, more expensive and overall a more solid, Sunday-like edition, compared to an ordinary newspaper. So Pu-Hu was probably printed in several thousand copies to be distributed in the neighbouring camps. Under Pu-Hu press license some supplements were published, one known from the WorldCat directory is Avanhard, a bulletin for the youth. The content policy is typical for any mainstream ethno-centric periodical: key world news, columns (mostly on emigration and political issues), rich material on national culture, something on world exploration: photo-essays, travel impression, edutainment, sport and humour. Some issues show a strong interest in the overseas migration and many mention the US as it was already becoming a go-to destination for thousands of the displaced persons.

Articles on Ukrainian culture were especially important as many if not all of Ukrainians in camps were devoid of any citizenship and were constructing their self-identification through ethnicity only. Those include a variety of formats: from columns on the Ukrainian language and exhibition reviews to biographies of known Ukrainian writers. Almost every other issue quotes some poetic verses of the contemporary poets, most of them also DP camp dwellers. No. 31 for 1947 has a spread on a newly opened DP camp ballet school for children, led by Valentyna Pereiaslavets (1907 - 1988). One can’t just tell that it was an amateurish group. Pereiaslavets was a professional ballerina, a prima of Kharkiv theatre of opera and ballet in 1939-1941 and she knew her trade. Pereiaslavets, whom Rudolf Nuriev called “a priestess of dance”, organised three age groups and accepted 20 students. An overview of their performance, one showing a broad repertoire and artistic costumes, is present in the article, supplemented with photographs.
Pu-Hu provides less place for acute political discussions - those were led mainly in the newspapers. The hottest topic was a probability to regain independent Ukraine and overthrow the Bolshevik regiment reigning the Ukraine. Those hopes were short-lived but strong. One can find features on Ukrains'ka povstans'ka armiia [Ukrainian Insurgent Army] leaders, news from the USSR. Articles on repressions and harsh criticism of Stalin appear every once in a while. There is even a review on Soviet press publications about the DP camps, printed under the headline Сrocodile tears.
For a reader less interested in the world events, the nos. propose fiction of two sorts: stories made up from popular film screenplays and original fiction. Issues from early 1947 feature parts of sci-fi novel Inzhener Marchenko by M. Bondarenko (pseud. Yurii Balko) and some book reviews. Inzhener Marchenko was issued in a book form by Pu-Hu publishing house in 1947: the publishing house issued several dozen books in 1940’s. A spread of no. 26 from 1947 tells a story about an event that took place in Augsburg on 8th August: a festival of the Ukrainian youth, Sviato ukrains'koi molodi. It was held in Somme-Kaserne and the photographs provide rich information on how the camp life was bright sometimes. Folk costumes, marching columns of young dwellers from Augsburg area camps, orchestra, ball plays. The fest was organised by Ukrainian Youth Association, a patriotic, quasi-political organisation that resembles a coupling of pioneer and scout movements.

Rare. While WorldCat fi finds separate issues in the libraries around the world, collections are a rarity. The largest group of the magazines – 64 issues – is present at Ukrainian National Museum of Chicago.

Status: On Hold
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