Item #1972 [ART PROPAGANDA] Za oboronu SSSR [i.e. For Defence of the USSR]
[ART PROPAGANDA] Za oboronu SSSR [i.e. For Defence of the USSR]
[ART PROPAGANDA] Za oboronu SSSR [i.e. For Defence of the USSR]
[ART PROPAGANDA] Za oboronu SSSR [i.e. For Defence of the USSR]
[ART PROPAGANDA] Za oboronu SSSR [i.e. For Defence of the USSR]
[ART PROPAGANDA] Za oboronu SSSR [i.e. For Defence of the USSR]
[ART PROPAGANDA] Za oboronu SSSR [i.e. For Defence of the USSR]
[ART PROPAGANDA] Za oboronu SSSR [i.e. For Defence of the USSR]
[ART PROPAGANDA] Za oboronu SSSR [i.e. For Defence of the USSR]

[ART PROPAGANDA] Za oboronu SSSR [i.e. For Defence of the USSR]

Item #1972

Moscow: Izdatel’stvo AKHRR: Shkola FZU pri 1-i Obraztsovoi tipografii, 1928. 48 pp.: ill. 27,5x20 cm. In original illustrated wrappers. Covers slightly soiled and rubbed, minor fragment of spine lost, leaves faded, otherwise very good. One of 10000 copies. Cover design with constructivist elements and letterpress design was created by (most likely) Czech artist P. Skala. The title page features constructivist typeset design.

An amazing collection of art propaganda projects that were supposed to be installed in workers’ clubs and reading huts or to be used during rallies. All works were dedicated to the 10th anniversary of the Red Army. All projects featured two main communist colors: red and black. In the early Soviet Union, constructivist designers created striking and inspiring visual propaganda. Innovative compositions with machine rhythm were enhanced by catchy words. This edition collects ideas on how to decorate “a military corner”, a shooting range, walls and windows of workers’ clubs and reading huts. Interior decorations show constructivist exhibiting principles, including use of moving showcases of several types. For “a military corner”, compilers offered some amusement structures. One of them was an easy-to-make quiz attraction. Its round field was divided for sections which depicted, for example, individual parts of a rifle or machine gun. A handle was spinning, setting the field in motion. When the field stopped, an arrow pointed to one of the drawings and a participant had to name a part of a gun, tell about it and how to use it. Frequently, shooting ranges were organized. Among stationary and mobile targets were Emperor, kulak, priest, Menshevik, NEPman, general, Chamberlain, Poincaré, Zhang Zuolin, et al. Another attraction wasn’t military but was ideologically charged. The edition includes an illustration of structure and text instructions on the creation of rayok [Russian peep show]. For propaganda purposes, it might show caricatures of Bolsheviks’ enemies captioned in a rhymed, humorous way. Walls on the inside were covered with posters, with slogans only or decorated in the constructivist style. Exemplary designs were published for a bulletin board, a class schedule, as well as a projection screen. Variants of emblems, political caricatures, illustrative diagrams were showcased for use in wall newspapers and posters. Every Soviet rally became a show with banners, propaganda puppets and costumes. An additional frame was often placed inside a costume if it was necessary to make “a propaganda giant”. The picture 73 depicts such giant costumes of Chamberlain, White general and a Ku Klux Klan member. Puppets might represent capitalists, fascists, White generals and other enemies of Bolsheviks (pic. 72).

Apart from interior solutions, exterior of reading huts and workers’ clubs, public spaces might be decorated. The edition includes options for communist design of flower beds and public gardens. For the winter season, propagandists exhibited snowmen mocking “enemies” (White general, bourgeois) and snow structures with communist decorations. To celebrate Defender of the Fatherland Day on February 23, propaganda scarecrows were burned. The idea was taken from the Maslenitsa holiday, which wasn’t officially celebrated in the USSR until the late 1950s. The rear sides of covers feature advertisements of AKHRR [Association of Artists of Revolutionary Russia] for production of luboks and sculptures.

No copies found in the USA.

Price: $8,500.00

See all items in Agitprop, Constructivism