Item #1983 [BLUE BLOUSE SPIRIT] Zhivaia gazeta “Krasnyi klich” [i.e. Living Newspaper “Red Call”]
[BLUE BLOUSE SPIRIT] Zhivaia gazeta “Krasnyi klich” [i.e. Living Newspaper “Red Call”]
[BLUE BLOUSE SPIRIT] Zhivaia gazeta “Krasnyi klich” [i.e. Living Newspaper “Red Call”]
[BLUE BLOUSE SPIRIT] Zhivaia gazeta “Krasnyi klich” [i.e. Living Newspaper “Red Call”]
[BLUE BLOUSE SPIRIT] Zhivaia gazeta “Krasnyi klich” [i.e. Living Newspaper “Red Call”]
[BLUE BLOUSE SPIRIT] Zhivaia gazeta “Krasnyi klich” [i.e. Living Newspaper “Red Call”]
[BLUE BLOUSE SPIRIT] Zhivaia gazeta “Krasnyi klich” [i.e. Living Newspaper “Red Call”]

[BLUE BLOUSE SPIRIT] Zhivaia gazeta “Krasnyi klich” [i.e. Living Newspaper “Red Call”]

Item #1983

[Petrovsk (Saratov region), late 1920s]. 8 photographs mounted. Photos: 22x16 or 23x17 cm. Album: 30,5x22 cm. In contemporary illustrated covers and a modern case reproducing two photographs. Few names are inscribed in pen throughout the album. Spine restored, some soiling, small fragments of covers lost, otherwise very good.

This noteworthy photo album contains photomontages dedicated to a “living newspaper” troup, a common phenomenon in the Soviet propaganda of the 1920s. As the pictures themselves state, these performers followed principles of the Blue Blouse. The movement rallied agitprop theater collectives in 1923-1933, promoting revolutionary art and contraposing themselves to the professional stage. Each “blueblouser” felt responsible for the whole team: during performance one person could become an illuminator, a singer, a makeup creator, a reciter, a gymnast, a dancer. The preparation of costumes required considerable imagination: the cardboard collage was often used to depict any clothing. The Blue Blouse periodical was an excellent example of constructivist design. Besides, usual photographs of productions demonstrated impressive postures and acrobatic formations.
By 1927, there were 5000 troupes with more than a hundred thousand actors involved. Such nonprofessional theater was established in most Soviet organizations. This album shows a group which was formed in the Petrovsk workers’ club called after Profintern. Along with other “blueblousers”, they might tour to factories, clubs, and visit other cities and villages. Most likely, the area of their performances was expanded to the Saratov region at least.
The album includes 2 individual portraits of organizer P. Miloslavov and editor M. Zaitsev, and 6 photomontage compositions. Piotr Miloslavov (1898-1975) is known as a singing teacher at the Petrovsk Pedagogical College and also a founder and director of the Volga Folk Choir. Photomontages feature actors during performances in 1925-1928 or thematic montages with their heads. Fortunately, the album contains most names of performers within collages or additionally handwritten in ink. The last montage shows the editorial board: their authors and poets, decorated with magazines “Blue Blouse” and “Club”. The photomontages include the names of main actors involved.

Price: $2,750.00

See all items in Theatre