Item #1989 [OBERIU MEETS UNOVIS] Begat’, Prygat’ [i.e. To Run, To Jump]. A. Vvedensky.
[OBERIU MEETS UNOVIS] Begat’, Prygat’ [i.e. To Run, To Jump]
[OBERIU MEETS UNOVIS] Begat’, Prygat’ [i.e. To Run, To Jump]
[OBERIU MEETS UNOVIS] Begat’, Prygat’ [i.e. To Run, To Jump]
[OBERIU MEETS UNOVIS] Begat’, Prygat’ [i.e. To Run, To Jump]
[OBERIU MEETS UNOVIS] Begat’, Prygat’ [i.e. To Run, To Jump]

[OBERIU MEETS UNOVIS] Begat’, Prygat’ [i.e. To Run, To Jump]

Item #1989

Leningrad: GIZ, 1930. 12 pp. 20x15 cm. Original chromolithographed wrappers. Spine is a bit scuffed, number in ink on the rear wrapper (N48), period paper label on the front cover with book’s details in English, indicating that the book left the USSR soon after it was produced.

Alexander Ivanovich Vvedensky (1904-1941) was a Russian poet, playwright, and children's writer, associated with the Association of Real Art (OBERIU). As part of the "last leftists" in pre-WWII Leningrad, the Oberiuts faced a brief existence. Their public speeches garnered harsh criticism in the press, with the Komsomol audience expressing scandalized reactions to the seemingly apolitical nature of these "incomprehensible" poets. In late 1931, Vvedensky, along with other Oberiuts, was arrested, reportedly due to accusations that he had toasted in memory of Nicholas II. Another version suggests that his arrest was linked to his performance of the "former anthem" at a social gathering. He was subsequently exiled to Kursk in 1932, where he lived for a time with Kharms, before residing in Vologda and Borisoglebsk. On September 27, 1941, Vvedensky faced another arrest, this time on charges of counterrevolutionary agitation. According to one account, he was transferred to Kazan but tragically passed away during transit on December 19, 1941. Vvedensky has written a handful of children’s books in the late 1920s, for the publications he collaborated with Filonov’s student Alisa Poret and with Malevich’s student Vera Ermolaeva (1893-1938). Ermolaeva, who has contributed her surrealistic design for this book, has already worked with another OBERIU poet Daniil Kharms on his children’s publication – Ivan Ivanovich Samovar, that came out in the same publishing house one year prior to this edition, in 1929. Vera Ermolaeva is best-known as one of the founders of suprematism. In 1919-1922 in Vitebsk, she worked alongside El Lissitzky, Chagal, Malevich, Suetin, where the new movement was born, theorized, and taught.

In 1929, she, along with artists V.V. Sterligov, K.I. Rozhdestvensky, L.A. Yudin, N.M. Suetin, and A.A. Leporskaya, established "The Group Of Pictorial And Plastic Realism." These artists, including Ermolaeva, organized creative "Tuesdays" and held "apartment" exhibitions at Ermolaeva's residence, accompanied by lively discussions. These exhibition activities, confined to a close-knit community of like-minded individuals, eventually led to a written denunciation. Tragically, on December 25, 1934, Ermolaeva was arrested and
subsequently executed in Karaganda in 1938 as an anti-Soviet conspirator. In the last 40 years the Ermolaeva is celebrated as one of the most unusual and independent voices in Russian avant-garde.

Extremely rare. First edition recorded only at Princeton.

Price: $6,500.00

Status: On Hold
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