[THE FIRST AND MAIN SOVIET PHOTO MAGAZINE] Sovetskoe foto [i.e. Soviet Photo]
[THE FIRST AND MAIN SOVIET PHOTO MAGAZINE] Sovetskoe foto [i.e. Soviet Photo]
[THE FIRST AND MAIN SOVIET PHOTO MAGAZINE] Sovetskoe foto [i.e. Soviet Photo]
[THE FIRST AND MAIN SOVIET PHOTO MAGAZINE] Sovetskoe foto [i.e. Soviet Photo]
[THE FIRST AND MAIN SOVIET PHOTO MAGAZINE] Sovetskoe foto [i.e. Soviet Photo]
[THE FIRST AND MAIN SOVIET PHOTO MAGAZINE] Sovetskoe foto [i.e. Soviet Photo]
[THE FIRST AND MAIN SOVIET PHOTO MAGAZINE] Sovetskoe foto [i.e. Soviet Photo]
[THE FIRST AND MAIN SOVIET PHOTO MAGAZINE] Sovetskoe foto [i.e. Soviet Photo]
[THE FIRST AND MAIN SOVIET PHOTO MAGAZINE] Sovetskoe foto [i.e. Soviet Photo]
[THE FIRST AND MAIN SOVIET PHOTO MAGAZINE] Sovetskoe foto [i.e. Soviet Photo]
[THE FIRST AND MAIN SOVIET PHOTO MAGAZINE] Sovetskoe foto [i.e. Soviet Photo]
[THE FIRST AND MAIN SOVIET PHOTO MAGAZINE] Sovetskoe foto [i.e. Soviet Photo]
[THE FIRST AND MAIN SOVIET PHOTO MAGAZINE] Sovetskoe foto [i.e. Soviet Photo]
[THE FIRST AND MAIN SOVIET PHOTO MAGAZINE] Sovetskoe foto [i.e. Soviet Photo]

[THE FIRST AND MAIN SOVIET PHOTO MAGAZINE] Sovetskoe foto [i.e. Soviet Photo]

Item #486

#1-16, 21-24 for 1930 (overall 20 issues). 1-512, 585-712 pp.: ill. 25x18,5 cm. The issues in illustrated wrappers under one contemporary binding. No covers of #15, some edges cut with minor losses of front covers (#2, 5, 9, 10, 12; not affecting the internal text), otherwise very good.

Two-weekly magazine “Soviet Photo’ was established in 1926 by Mikhail Kol’tsov and issued throughout the Soviet era. The periodical depicted the great construction of young country using the most effective visual method of propaganda. The core section ‘How the Life Changes’ overviews the new works provided by contemporary photographers (later it was called ‘The Face of Soviet Country’). There are the works by A. Shaikhet, S. Fridliand, R. Karmen, M. Penson, B. Ignatovich, S. Strunnikov, et al. They experimented with photography against daily light or welding sparks, inside the darkness of factories,
captured the dancing and running people, flying airplane, driving car or running horse. Every work has a caption consisting of the name, conditions and technical aspects. In this section the last portrait of V. Mayakovsky (post-mortem) was published as the best document of this event, which “had to inspire the Soviet people to fight for the socialist base of life”.

The magazine regularly organized the photography competitions reflecting the socialist life. It was not limited to the successes in construction, radio engineering and aviation. One of the major stream in propaganda demonstrated how the women were involved in the building of Soviet future. The remarkable changes occurred in the Soviet Central Asia and the photographers sought to show that portraying the women on the streets. An important part of propaganda art was a photomontage which the edition spread among amateur photographers. ‘‘The photomontage technically raised with revolution’’, written in the article on this topic and confirmed that with two photomontages depicting pioneers and worker’s club. Another kind of propaganda art was a photo caricature that could surpass the drawn one. The magazine presented the bold creative experiments in this sphere and enlighted the readers how they should make it. An interesting edition presents a common photography as a tool increasing the labor enthusiasm of the broad proletarian masses.

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