[MAYAKOVSKY ON THE PARISIAN ART SCENE] Gore pakharia: Khudozhestvenno-literaturnyi i obshhestvennyi dvuhnedel’nyi zhurnal [i.e. Woe of the Ploughman: Artistic, Literary and Social Two Weeks Magazine] #3, 1923.

[MAYAKOVSKY ON THE PARISIAN ART SCENE] Gore pakharia: Khudozhestvenno-literaturnyi i obshhestvennyi dvuhnedel’nyi zhurnal [i.e. Woe of the Ploughman: Artistic, Literary and Social Two Weeks Magazine] #3, 1923.

Item #566

Vladivostok: Primgubkompomgol, 1923. 34 pp.: ill. 26x24 cm. In original illustrated covers, a small tear of the illustration. Good, restored cover and margins.

Very rare. One of 2000 copies. One issue of six ever published, the last one under this title (#4 appeared under the title ‘Typhoon’). Cover with mounted illustration by V. Pashkevich “Accord of Pain”. Four of his works reproduced inside as well.

This is a rare magazine of the Soviet Far East Futurism, edited by Pavel Liubarsky (1891-1970), leading avant-garde artist of the region, founder of the art group ‘Green Cat’.

Vladivostok was the last spark of futurism. The October Revolution and the Civil War scattered futurists in different directions, in particular, D. Burliuk and N. Aseev had gone to the Far East. There the new group ‘Creation’ was founded in 1920 and rallied, apart them, S. Tretiakov, N. Nasimovich-Chuzhak, A. Bogdanov, P. Luibarsky, N. Matveev, V. Mart, A. Nesmelov, et al. An heir of this group (and its magazine under the same name) became the magazine ‘Woe of the Ploughman’.

Among the poems and articles by the local authors, the magazine published V. Mayakovsky’s impressions of Paris art life. He had visited France in 1922 and came back with vivid sketches on foreign culture. The magazine published that piece where Mayakovsky observed the art market, the workshops of Picasso, Goncharova and
Larionov, Léger, Delaunay, Braque and Barthe. Mayakovsky remarked: “I remember, some Russian magazines noticed that Picasso turned to classicism. I can dispel any fears. Picasso has no classicism”. Interestingly, this text is illustrated with two artworks by V. Pashkevich and one by an unknown artist. Overall three illustrations in this issue depict the death, the Russian famine of 1921-1922. The magazine was published by Primgubkomgol (Primorsky Provincial Committee on Famine Support) which raised money for the starving Volga region. The bibliography on famine included as well.

Worldcat doesn’t track this edition.

Price: $1,200.00

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