[BANNED BULGAKOV IN THE HEART OF SOVIET ASIA] Zvezda Vostoka : Organ Soiuza Pisatelei Vostoka [i.e. Star of the East: Organ of the Eastern Writers Union] #3, 1967
[BANNED BULGAKOV IN THE HEART OF SOVIET ASIA] Zvezda Vostoka : Organ Soiuza Pisatelei Vostoka [i.e. Star of the East: Organ of the Eastern Writers Union] #3, 1967
[BANNED BULGAKOV IN THE HEART OF SOVIET ASIA] Zvezda Vostoka : Organ Soiuza Pisatelei Vostoka [i.e. Star of the East: Organ of the Eastern Writers Union] #3, 1967
[BANNED BULGAKOV IN THE HEART OF SOVIET ASIA] Zvezda Vostoka : Organ Soiuza Pisatelei Vostoka [i.e. Star of the East: Organ of the Eastern Writers Union] #3, 1967
[BANNED BULGAKOV IN THE HEART OF SOVIET ASIA] Zvezda Vostoka : Organ Soiuza Pisatelei Vostoka [i.e. Star of the East: Organ of the Eastern Writers Union] #3, 1967

[BANNED BULGAKOV IN THE HEART OF SOVIET ASIA] Zvezda Vostoka : Organ Soiuza Pisatelei Vostoka [i.e. Star of the East: Organ of the Eastern Writers Union] #3, 1967

Item #583

Tashkent: Ob’edinennoe izd-vo «Kzyl. Uzbekistan,» «Pravada Vostoka» i «Uzbekistoni surkh.”, 1967. 240 pp.: ill. 26x17 cm. In original illustrated wrappers. Slightly rubbed, small fragments of spine lost, otherwise very good.

First and only edition. This is the rare issue of the oldest magazine in
Central Asia which draws our attention to the abundance of writers
whose publication faced censorship difficulties at that time: Bulgakov,
Mandelstam, Platonov, Babel, et al. It was considered the charity edition tied with 1966 Tashkent earthquake and its aftermath. The issue itself
became a myth gathering gossip about its content and circumstances
of publishing.

“When it had appeared in Moscow, it seemed like a bombshell…
It was full of banned materials. Firstly, there were fragments from
Mikhail Bulgakov’s ‘Notes on the Cuffs’” which his widow sent to the
magazine. An autobiographical work was partly published during his
lifetime only once - in the almanac “Revival” (1923) - and appeared
again in this magazine. For now, the only third of the original text is
preserved by pieces but this work confirms: in 1921 Bulgakov strived to
emigrate.

Apart from it, the issue gave the chance to Babel’s novel
“Kolyvushka” and Platonov’s play “Father’s Voice”. It included the poems
by repressed Mandelstam and unfavorable Voznesensky, the diary and
drawings by the avant-garde artist Kliment Red’ko who was excluded
from the Union of Artists. Two works dedicated to the Georgian poet
Tabidze and the Jewish theatre director Mikhoels, repressed in the
Stalinist period. The poems of contemporary authors like Okudzhava,
Akhmadulina, Evtushenko tried to dilute the dangerous collection.
“Writers of Russia - to the Victims of Tashkent Earthquake” was the
best slogan which reflected the international nature of provided help. But what it was: did the Soviet writers lend a hand to Tashkent or did
Tashkent magazine help the Soviet writers?

Worldcat shows 5 copies located at University of Chicago, University of Kentucky, Cornell University, University of California. Los Angeles and UC Berkeley Libraries.

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