[PHOTO CHRONICLE OF THE CONSTRUCTIVIST TRAM STATION] Zhelezo-betonnyi pavil’on-stantsiia v Mar’inoi roshche postroiki 1924-25 g. [i.e. Reinforced Concrete Pavilion-Station in Mar’ina Roshcha, Built in 1924-1925] / Photographs by N. Lebedev
[PHOTO CHRONICLE OF THE CONSTRUCTIVIST TRAM STATION] Zhelezo-betonnyi pavil’on-stantsiia v Mar’inoi roshche postroiki 1924-25 g. [i.e. Reinforced Concrete Pavilion-Station in Mar’ina Roshcha, Built in 1924-1925] / Photographs by N. Lebedev
[PHOTO CHRONICLE OF THE CONSTRUCTIVIST TRAM STATION] Zhelezo-betonnyi pavil’on-stantsiia v Mar’inoi roshche postroiki 1924-25 g. [i.e. Reinforced Concrete Pavilion-Station in Mar’ina Roshcha, Built in 1924-1925] / Photographs by N. Lebedev
[PHOTO CHRONICLE OF THE CONSTRUCTIVIST TRAM STATION] Zhelezo-betonnyi pavil’on-stantsiia v Mar’inoi roshche postroiki 1924-25 g. [i.e. Reinforced Concrete Pavilion-Station in Mar’ina Roshcha, Built in 1924-1925] / Photographs by N. Lebedev

[PHOTO CHRONICLE OF THE CONSTRUCTIVIST TRAM STATION] Zhelezo-betonnyi pavil’on-stantsiia v Mar’inoi roshche postroiki 1924-25 g. [i.e. Reinforced Concrete Pavilion-Station in Mar’ina Roshcha, Built in 1924-1925] / Photographs by N. Lebedev

Item #933

[Moscow: M.G.Zh.D., 1925]. Ca. 26,5x22 cm. Sixteen mounted gelatin silver prints, each ca. 11x15 cm. No captions. In original cloth folder with gilt lettering. Soiling of folder and foxing on the inner side, but the leaves are near fine.
An attractive album of rare photos proving triumph of constructivism style everywhere, even in Moscow tram stations. This pavilion, and the most Moscow tram stations of that time, was designed by constructivist architect Eugenii Shervinskii (1878-1942). In the mid-1920s, due to the beginning of mass construction in Moscow, Shervinskii worked in the Sanstroi (Moscow Communal Services) and Moscow City Railways (as Department of Trams was named). For the latter, he designed both standard and original projects of urban constructions: houses, schools, public bathrooms, restrooms and tram pavilions. He operated classical constructivist methods, attracting attention by a skillion and lean-to roof and high pipes. The backside of the tram station had a room where a department of Mosgorbank (Moscow State Bank) was located.
The photographs became a chronicle of construction including pictures of the structure on different stages, workers carrying out their duties, surrounding buildings with signboards, bank, tram line, waiting passengers as well as streets and market in the background. They were captured by Nikolai Lebedev, a little-known photographer of Moscow monuments and civil constructions who contributed to state museum funds.
The pavilion was located in a crowded place on Aleksandrovskaia street (Mar’ina Roshcha district) and served to three tram routes (#2, 11 and 14). One of them, lasting to Sukharev Tower, was built in 1904 and was one of the oldest routes of electric public transport in Moscow. Until this pavilion was opened, there was only a tram control station (depicted with some passengers on one of the photos as well).
Soon the city reconstruction and changes in public transport abolished these tram lines; the pavilion wasn’t preserved.
Not found in Worldcat.

Price: $4,500.00

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