Item #1795 [ORAL FOLK ART IN THE SOVIET UNION] Chastushki rodiny Esenina – sela Konstantinovo [i.e. Folk Ditties from Esenin’s Native Village Konstantinovo] / Collected by E. and A. Esenin
[ORAL FOLK ART IN THE SOVIET UNION] Chastushki rodiny Esenina – sela Konstantinovo [i.e. Folk Ditties from Esenin’s Native Village Konstantinovo] / Collected by E. and A. Esenin
[ORAL FOLK ART IN THE SOVIET UNION] Chastushki rodiny Esenina – sela Konstantinovo [i.e. Folk Ditties from Esenin’s Native Village Konstantinovo] / Collected by E. and A. Esenin
[ORAL FOLK ART IN THE SOVIET UNION] Chastushki rodiny Esenina – sela Konstantinovo [i.e. Folk Ditties from Esenin’s Native Village Konstantinovo] / Collected by E. and A. Esenin
[ORAL FOLK ART IN THE SOVIET UNION] Chastushki rodiny Esenina – sela Konstantinovo [i.e. Folk Ditties from Esenin’s Native Village Konstantinovo] / Collected by E. and A. Esenin

[ORAL FOLK ART IN THE SOVIET UNION] Chastushki rodiny Esenina – sela Konstantinovo [i.e. Folk Ditties from Esenin’s Native Village Konstantinovo] / Collected by E. and A. Esenin

Moscow: Sovremennye problemy, 1927. Item #1795

45 pp.+3 pp. of ads. 18x13 cm. In original illustrated wrappers. Spine restored, some stains occasionally.

First and only edition. One of 10 000 copies.
This early Soviet publication was compiled by younger sisters of Sergey Esenin, Ekatherina (1905-1977) and Alexandra (1911-1981). The book came out two years after his death, as “one of the humble wreaths on the grave of the unique poet”.
Folk ditties represent oral traditions reacting to all changes in daily life. It became the background for the major topics, connecting with relations between people. This book collects five sections: “Suffering-love”, “Dancing-mocking”, “Betrayal-jealousy”, “Separation-disappointment”, “Friendship, marriage, etc.” In them, compilers gathered songs of various sizes that are united or not by a common plot and some characters.
Ditties created in the 1920s witnessed how tractors were making noise in fields while patriarchy adjacent to the attempts of Soviet women to act as equal participants in political, social and everyday life. According to the foreword, “Next to an electric light bulb, a Christian image of the Savior and the Slavic pagan image of Dazhbog coexisted”. Frequently, contemporary ditties contain clear markers of the Soviet 1920s, such as “my blue-blouse ditty”, “all guys are Komsomol members, no one to go out with”.

The only copy is located in NYPL.

Price: $650.00

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