Item #1797 [EVENKS] Simu. A. Sorokin.
[EVENKS] Simu
[EVENKS] Simu
[EVENKS] Simu
[EVENKS] Simu
[EVENKS] Simu

[EVENKS] Simu

Omsk: Izd. Sib. khud. prom. tekhnikuma, 1928. Item #1797

12 pp.: ill., 1 ill. 28x19 cm. In original illustrated wrappers. Spine restored, light soiling occasionally, otherwise very good.

Very rare.
A graduation project by S. Vakhrameev that he carried out while studying at the Printing department of the Siberian Art and Industrial School. The separate book edition was published after the work was first printed in the student newspaper “Working Path” (1928, No. 8).
Cover design features a type design stylized under ornament and an illustration: a person wearing nationally embroidered clothes is heading to the Lenin’s mausoleum (its early wooden version built for 1924-1930). As the frontispiece, a full-page colorful lithograph was inserted. It shows a demonstration for national cultures on the Red Square and the main character of the book is drawn as the central person in the proсession.
For the project, Vakhrameev chose one story by writer Anton Sorokin (1884-1928). The writer was born into a rich merchant family of Old Believers and moved to Omsk in early childhood. His literary debut was in 1900. His main literary topic became the power of gold over people. His play ‘Gold’ was going to be staged by V. Meyerhold in the Komissarzhevskaya theater, but the production was banned by censors. The pinnacle of Sorokin’s work is the anti-war story ‘Laughter of the Yellow Devil’ that was first published in the newspaper ‘Omsk Vestnik’ in 1914. After the Revolution, Sorokin became an influential figure in literary Omsk and thus contributed to early Soviet Siberian literature. At one time, Anton Sorokin received a “Certificate of Genius” from David Burliuk. In 1928, the writer died due to tuberculosis.
In memory of him, Vakhrameev engraved his linocut portrait and created 6 small illustrations and an initial for the story “Simu”. It is about an Evenk man named Simu who worked for Old-Believer merchants before the Revolution. He was an eyewitness of their dissolute life during Tobolsk fairs and pious life upon their return home. Simu was forced to mediate in their dishonest deals with indigenous people of the North. Changes occurred in one time, previous merchants were lost, other people turned up offering more beneficial deals. Simu has inquired about Bolsheviks and thought up to visit them in Moscow, with a great sturgeon as a gift. Over time, Simu reached the city, visited the mausoleum and was settled in a dormitory of North minorities. He took part in the demonstration on November 7, observed factories and a printing shop of the Izvestia newspaper. Simu was inspired by socialist life and then told about everything to Evenks. As a result, a Soviet was formed in that area. The last linocut (placed as an endpiece) features an Evenk gathering decided “Let a Soviet be!”.
In all, it is an extraordinary and well-performed propaganda edition relating to national policy in the early Soviet Union.
Not in Worldcat.

Status: On Hold
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