Item #1801 [EVENKS] Sledopyty dalekogo severa [i.e. Trackers of the Far North]. D. Debabov, El-Registan.
[EVENKS] Sledopyty dalekogo severa [i.e. Trackers of the Far North]
[EVENKS] Sledopyty dalekogo severa [i.e. Trackers of the Far North]
[EVENKS] Sledopyty dalekogo severa [i.e. Trackers of the Far North]
[EVENKS] Sledopyty dalekogo severa [i.e. Trackers of the Far North]
[EVENKS] Sledopyty dalekogo severa [i.e. Trackers of the Far North]
[EVENKS] Sledopyty dalekogo severa [i.e. Trackers of the Far North]

[EVENKS] Sledopyty dalekogo severa [i.e. Trackers of the Far North]

Moscow; Leningrad: Detizdat, 1937. Item #1801

112 pp.: ill. 29x22,5 cm. In original illustrated cardboards; original illustrated endpapers.Covers rubbed and bumped, with small fragments lost, little tears of endpapers, some children’s marks in blue pencil on photos, otherwise very good internally.

First and only edition. Very rare with no copies found in Worldcat.
This Soviet photobook for youngsters shows life of Evenks to the North from the Arctic Circle. According to Karasik, it is likely the only Soviet high-quality album reproducing works by a single photographer in the 1930s.
The term “evenki” was introduced to common use in 1931. Before this date, Russian sources included the word “tungusy”, not distinguishing them from other representatives of the Tungusic language family. The book referred to Evenks lived on the Taymyr peninsula, the northernmost part of the mainland of Eurasia.
The Soviet authorities globally reformed the way of life of the nomadic peoples of Siberia. The forced transition to a sedentary lifestyle reduced the functionality of many Evenki cultural traditions and significantly reduced the territorial rights of Evenki clans. Collectivization, consolidation of places of compact residence and increased industrial impact negatively influenced Evenki culture. In 1926, 38 600 Evenks were recorded in the USSR. Of 35 thousand Evenks living in Russia in the 2010s, about 4400 representatives were registered in the Krasnoyarsk region, including the Taymyr peninsula.
The pictures were taken by photographer Dmitry Debabov. Previously, they were printed in magazines “Ogonek” (Little Fire; No.36 for 1935), “Sovetskoe foto” (Soviet Photo; No.9 for 1935), “SSSR na stroike” (The USSR in Construction; No.10 for 1935), “Stroim” (We Are Building; No.5 for 1937).
In the magazine “Soviet Photo” (No.9 for 1935) Debabov wrote about his first journey to the North – how he photographed local hunters and landscapes. It was especially difficult to take landscape shots from a fast-moving dog-sleigh, so Debabov had to roll off and take some pictures. In some cases, a team hadn’t gotten too far from him, a driver could hear the photographer’s call or could notice his absence, and the sleigh came back. More often Debabov was obliged to make his own way to the nearest nomad camp.
Pictures don’t illustrate the text – the text rather complements the images. There are brief accounts of the harsh environment of the taiga and Arctic tundra, of the new Soviet life of the Evenk people, notes on hunting scenes.
The text was written by journalist El-Registan (1899-1945). He is the author of travel notes about the White Sea Canal, Balkhash, Karaganda, Tien Shan, Kuzbass, Magnitostroy, the Stalingrad Tractor Plant and the Ural Machine-Building Plant, etc. He participated in the Karakum rally and Arctic flights. In 1936, together with Debabov, El-Registan released a book ‘An Extraordinary Journey’ about a flight across Siberia and the Arctic zone.

Karasik M. The Soviet Photobook, 1920-1941. P. 594-595.

Status: On Hold
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