Item #1802 [VOLGA GERMANS] Khoroshie tovarishchi. Malen’kie stsenki dlia postanovki i chteniia = Die guten Kameraden. Kleine Szenen [i.e. Good Fellows. Short Scenes for Staging and Reciting] / Compiled by V. Bestuzheva
[VOLGA GERMANS] Khoroshie tovarishchi. Malen’kie stsenki dlia postanovki i chteniia = Die guten Kameraden. Kleine Szenen [i.e. Good Fellows. Short Scenes for Staging and Reciting] / Compiled by V. Bestuzheva
[VOLGA GERMANS] Khoroshie tovarishchi. Malen’kie stsenki dlia postanovki i chteniia = Die guten Kameraden. Kleine Szenen [i.e. Good Fellows. Short Scenes for Staging and Reciting] / Compiled by V. Bestuzheva
[VOLGA GERMANS] Khoroshie tovarishchi. Malen’kie stsenki dlia postanovki i chteniia = Die guten Kameraden. Kleine Szenen [i.e. Good Fellows. Short Scenes for Staging and Reciting] / Compiled by V. Bestuzheva

[VOLGA GERMANS] Khoroshie tovarishchi. Malen’kie stsenki dlia postanovki i chteniia = Die guten Kameraden. Kleine Szenen [i.e. Good Fellows. Short Scenes for Staging and Reciting] / Compiled by V. Bestuzheva

Moscow; Leningrad: Gosudarstvennoe uchebno-pedagogicheskoe izdatel’stvo, 1946. Item #1802

36 pp.: ill. + 2 pp. of ads. 16,5x13 cm. In original illustrated wrappers. Stains around rusty staples, stain on upper inner corner of front cover and some leaves, otherwise very good.

First edition. Extremely rare.
Title page is in Russian, but the cover and all stories are fully in German. At the end, a German-Russian dictionary is placed where words and phrases are divided by works. The cover design and illustrations were created by Lev Smekhov (1908-1978). Being a Vkhutemas graduate, Smekhov was mostly engaged in the book design. Besides books, he contributed to magazines “Pionerskaia pravda” [Young Pioneer Truth], “Vozhaty” [Leader], “Pioner” [Young Pioneer], “Tekhnika – molodezhi” [Technology for Youth], “Nauka i zhizn’ [Science and Life].
This collection of 4 plays was compiled for 3rd year students of German language. Inheriting pre-revolutionary gymnasium programs, the Soviet education system included the only foreign language [German] for decades. After WWII, the state needed to rebuild the entire education system in order to provide schoolchildren with a choice in learning a foreign language. Children studied German in order to have access to the entire body of scientific literature. Therefore, the transition to English was delayed – only in the 1970s it became an alternative for students occasionally. In the early 1980s, German was still considered the main language, although no one could explain why.
Apart from mass education of Soviet schoolchildren, these plays might be on sale for German families living in the USSR. On territory of the former Russian Empire, ethnic Germans settled and historically lived along the Volga River and in Ukraine for ages. In 1918, the Labor Commune of Volga Germans was formed and then renamed into the Volga German ASSR in 1923. In 1924, German was established as the second language for office work and education. At the same time, mass public education among the Germans began to form at a rapid pace. In the early 1930s, more than 570 thousand Germans were registered there. For some years, this ASSR was a part of the Saratov region. A significant number of Volga Germans, especially those with higher education and industrial specialties, lived and worked in Saratov. They made up a significant proportion of the teaching staff of higher and secondary educational institutions and workers of industrial enterprises.
During the Great Purge, Volga Germans were targeted, and following the German invasion of the Soviet Union in 1941, ethnic Germans were deported to concentration camps in Siberia and Central Asia resulting in the deaths of an estimated 1.5 million Volga Germans.
The book was reprinted four times in the late Stalinist period.

Not found in Worldcat.

Status: On Hold
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