Item #1881 [AUTOBIOGRAPHIES OF THE WORKERS OF THE STALINGRAD TRACTOR PLANT] Lyudi Stalingradskogo traktornogo [i.e. People of the Stalingrad Tractor Plant]. Ya N. Ilyin.
[AUTOBIOGRAPHIES OF THE WORKERS OF THE STALINGRAD TRACTOR PLANT] Lyudi Stalingradskogo traktornogo [i.e. People of the Stalingrad Tractor Plant]
[AUTOBIOGRAPHIES OF THE WORKERS OF THE STALINGRAD TRACTOR PLANT] Lyudi Stalingradskogo traktornogo [i.e. People of the Stalingrad Tractor Plant]
[AUTOBIOGRAPHIES OF THE WORKERS OF THE STALINGRAD TRACTOR PLANT] Lyudi Stalingradskogo traktornogo [i.e. People of the Stalingrad Tractor Plant]
[AUTOBIOGRAPHIES OF THE WORKERS OF THE STALINGRAD TRACTOR PLANT] Lyudi Stalingradskogo traktornogo [i.e. People of the Stalingrad Tractor Plant]

[AUTOBIOGRAPHIES OF THE WORKERS OF THE STALINGRAD TRACTOR PLANT] Lyudi Stalingradskogo traktornogo [i.e. People of the Stalingrad Tractor Plant]

[Moscow]: izd-vo Istoriya zavodov, 1934. Item #1881

491, [3] pp.: ill. 22,6x15,1 cm. In original publisher’s cloth binding. Fine. Previous owner’s inscription on the recto of the foretitle (approximate translation): ‘Asyutka! This poem is created by Yasha Ilyin. He was able to do this because his blood never calmed down in him, his mind was also always active. He was a Bolshevik. He was one of the first to introduce me to the newspaper - John Reed born in 1905. He treated people like this book and the book like a person. And if you can’t hear his burr cheerful voice, if you cannot smile looking into his sparkling, intelligent eyes, read this book. And make me remember him, so that I can speak honestly and loudly: - Yasha, I write as a Bolshevik. 5.III.1934. Rudya’.
In the inscription, the author, Rudya (Rudolf), refers to the newspaper Pravda [i.e. Truth] with which Yakov Ilyin (1905-1932) collaborated from 1925 until his early death in 1932. The two were apparently coworkers at the periodical, and the inscription serves as a type of obituary from the workmate. Overall, this passionate text gives us an interesting insight into the relationships inside Pravda collective in the 1920s.

Scarce. Second revised edition. First edition published in 1933. Following the death of the compiler, the Soviet writer Yakov Ilyin, the main work on the collection of materials and processing was conducted by B. Galin. Compared to the first edition, this second edition features updated biographies of the people of the Stalingrad Tractor. In 1934, the book was translated into English.
A compilation of autobiographies by the workers of the Stalingrad tractor plant (nowadays Volgograd tractor plant).
After the launch of the first five-year plan in 1928, the territory of the Soviet Union became the birthplace of multiple factories. In September 1931, the newspaper Pravda published an article by Maxim Gorky Istoriya zavodov i fabrik [i.e. History of Plants and Factories] that set the goal to cover the successes of socialist construction in print. Gorky’s proposal was approved by the Decree of the Central Committee of the CPSU of October 10, 1931, as a result of which the publishing house Istoriya zavodov [i.e. History of Plants] was formed. Maxim, who became one of the leaders of the editorial board of the new publishing house, initiated the process of printing editions about different factories across the Soviet Union.
Published in 1934, this book represents a compilation of 32 autobiographies by the workers of the Stalingrad Tractor Plant. The factory was founded in 1930 and served as one of the first industrial facilities to be built as part of the planned rapid industrialization of the USSR. The edition opens with the text of Stalin’s speech read out at a general meeting on the day of the start-up of the Stalingrad Tractor Plant on June 17, 1930. The main section of the book is preceded by the foreword of the authors Yakov Ilyin and B. Galin, as well as Maxim Gorky’s review, which assesses the edition as ‘one of the most interesting and original books that have appeared in our literature for the last 15 years’. The publication features autobiographies both by the Soviet and American workers of the factory. The vast majority of the narrators are men and only two of them are women. In the texts, the authors talk about their lives before and during their work at the plant and draw an interesting picture of how their life changed after the Stalingrad Factory. Together with the autobiographical notes, the narrators underline their attachment to their work site and express gratitude for the attention they feel from the authorities. It is especially interesting to observe how the American workers of the plant reveal their disappointment with the United States. One of the narrators, Robert Robinson (negro) recalls how he couldn’t find a job in the USA because of his skin color (I felt betrayed! - R.R.) and how warm-hearted the USSR was towards him. The authors also highlight the development they have experienced since the first months of work and review different episodes from their work life, such as initial bad attitude towards Americans, discipline problems and the ways of their tackling, etc.
The book features numerous black-and-white illustrations showing different aspects of the work process at the plant. Each autobiography is preceded by the workers’ portraits.
Overall, an important document of the first five-year plan and the ‘new happy Soviet men’.

Worldcat shows copies of the edition at New York Public Library System, Pennsylvania State University Libraries, and Stanford University.

Price: $950.00

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