Item #1910 [SEX EDUCATION IN THE USSR] Polovoe vospitanie iunykh pionerov [i.e. Sex Education of Young Pioneers]. A. Zalkind.
[SEX EDUCATION IN THE USSR] Polovoe vospitanie iunykh pionerov [i.e. Sex Education of Young Pioneers]

[SEX EDUCATION IN THE USSR] Polovoe vospitanie iunykh pionerov [i.e. Sex Education of Young Pioneers]

Moscow: Molodaia gvardiia, 1930. Item #1910

93, [2] pp. 17,5x12,5 cm. In original publisher’s wrappers. Small fragments of spine lost, otherwise very good.
Second edition. Rare.

Along with other early Soviet books, this publication called for proper sex education instead of silencing related issues. Breaking down of the family and old ethics, disorganization of mass schools, and a high level of child homelessness influenced the mindset and manners of youth. This caused the creation of this book targeted at educators who worked with pioneers of 10-14 years old. In terms of socialist society, collectivism was supposed to dominate over children and teenage romance.
“The pioneer movement should become the main fighter against the parasitic sexual switching of adolescents’ energy” – the author writes. Psychoanalyst and paedologist Aron Zalkind (1888-1936) was Bekhterev’s student. Initially, he tried to promote Freudism as an interpretation of psychoanalysis compatible with Marxism-Leninism, then switched to paedology. In late 1931, he was blamed for “Menshevik-idealistic eclecticism”, and was also subjected for his
Freudianism and “perversions at work”. The severe criticism forced him to leave the Institute of Psychology, Pedology and Psychotechnics and even led to a heart attack in 1936.
In this book, Zalkind elaborates on mistakes that a pioneers’ educator made toward children feeling attracted, village illiteracy making children feel attraction too early. He mentions that in street life, imitation of adults leads to children’s prostitution and general immorality. To prevent and combat early sexual desire, the author proposes collectivism, collective control over each participant [“pioneer ethics”], common physical education activities and pioneer camps. Thus,
Soviet children and teenagers got used to seeing semi-bare bodies during sports events; this method was supposed to fortify their manners. The author requires not to single out sexual issues among other issues of ethics, everyday life, and social activities in conversations between an educator and the pioneers. Even in terms of collective responsibility, educators were urged not to judge someone’s romantic feelings collectively. In the preface, the author lists his other works on sex education in socialist society and pedagogy general.

Not in Worldcat.

Status: On Hold
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