Item #1937 [REVOLUTIONARY ART IN EARLY SOVIET UKRAINE] 10 rokiv Zhovtnia. Kataloh iuvileynoi vystavky [i.e. 10 years of October. Catalogue of the anniversary exhibition]
[REVOLUTIONARY ART IN EARLY SOVIET UKRAINE] 10 rokiv Zhovtnia. Kataloh iuvileynoi vystavky [i.e. 10 years of October. Catalogue of the anniversary exhibition]
[REVOLUTIONARY ART IN EARLY SOVIET UKRAINE] 10 rokiv Zhovtnia. Kataloh iuvileynoi vystavky [i.e. 10 years of October. Catalogue of the anniversary exhibition]
[REVOLUTIONARY ART IN EARLY SOVIET UKRAINE] 10 rokiv Zhovtnia. Kataloh iuvileynoi vystavky [i.e. 10 years of October. Catalogue of the anniversary exhibition]
[REVOLUTIONARY ART IN EARLY SOVIET UKRAINE] 10 rokiv Zhovtnia. Kataloh iuvileynoi vystavky [i.e. 10 years of October. Catalogue of the anniversary exhibition]

[REVOLUTIONARY ART IN EARLY SOVIET UKRAINE] 10 rokiv Zhovtnia. Kataloh iuvileynoi vystavky [i.e. 10 years of October. Catalogue of the anniversary exhibition]

Kharkiv-Kyiv-Odesa: Narkomos USRR, 1927. Item #1937

36 unnumbered pages of plates. Printed w/o title page. 17x13,5 cm.

Original publisher’s wrappers.Pencil marks and crossed out numerical stamp on front cover. Lower part of the front cover detached from the spine. Rust on staples. Overall good condition.

By 1927, Ukraine was a Soviet Socialist Republic for 5 years already. But unlike Russia, Ukraine didn’t go through the revolution, it was rather taken over by the Bolsheviks with some support from the elites. The new political realities in the UkSSR were asking for new artists and new forms of expressing the greatness and the goodness of the new regime. 10 rokiv Zhovtnia, Organised by People's Commissariat of Education of the UkSSR, became a travelling art exhibition celebrating 10 years of the Russian proletarian revolution - but envisioned by the Ukrainian artists.
1920’s was a period of indigenization so there were yet no universal art guidelines, but lots of creative freedom. During those years, Ukrainian art and theatre were connected and feeding on both the best of Soviet and of Western creative examples. Diverse art scene, yet not destroyed by the harsh censors, famine and war conflicts, was a place of experimental battles, expressing social, political, cultural ideas. The managers of the exhibition themselves were directly asking for revolutionary art pieces that were closely interconnected with real Ukrainian life - and not some “Karl Marx portrait embroideries”. During the preparation for the exhibition, it was said that all art unions and all artists are welcome to send in the works (see: Vol’sky, B. Shche pro vseukrains'ku khudozhniu vystavku "10 rokyv zhovtnia". In: Kul'tura i pobut, #29 for 1927). No wonder that the 10 rokiv Zhovtnia catalogue shows such a diversity of artistic visions.

Creatively, the exhibition was fueled mainly by three key Ukrainian art groups of the era: nationalistic Asotsiatsiia revoliutsiinoho mystetstva Ukrainy [Association of revolutionary art of Ukraine] favoring monumental art, prorealistic Asotsiatsiia khudozhnykiv Chervonoi Ukrainy [Association of Red Ukraine artists] and avant-garde Ob'iednannia suchasnykh myttsiv Ukrainy [Association of contemporary artists of Ukraine] that for time followed Western European trends and experiments. Combining “quiet” and “loud” art alike, the catalogue shows artists from totally different backgrounds approaching a specific topic not as directed by some State-funded organization, but with different methods and their own unique ideas.
From avant-garde murals of Grigory Dovzhenko (1899 - 1980) and Vasil Sedlyar (1899 - 1937) to a parade portrait of Oleksii Shovkunenko (1884-1974). From prominent and energetic women artists like Mariia Kotliarevs'ka (1902 - 1984) and Josephina Dindo (1902 - 1953) to an elegiac paysage by Oleksandr Symonov (1875 - 1957).
From realistic Dniprel'stan painting by Karpo Trokhymenko (1885 - 1979) by a Jewish genre scene of Teofil Fraierman (1883 - 1957). Indeed, most works are not about revolution or political leaders per se. But they had what the curators were looking for - some revolutionary energy in them. The art shown on the exhibition was in a sense already official, but still free-spirited.
The art exhibition opened first on 8th October 1927 in Kharkiv and travelled to 8 cities throughout 1927 and 1928. It was the first pan-Ukrainian exhibition ever. The art objects shown were a subject of change from town to town. Thus, a number of such catalogues were issued, all having some differences in appearance and listed works present on the plates. By the end of the exhibition, Kyiv Art Gallery acquired 58 works of art included in 10 rokiv Zhovtnia.

Rare. Not i in KVK. WorldCat fifinds a copy of another edition of the catalogue at the Getty Library. The National Library of Ukraine also owns a different version of the catalogue.

Status: On Hold
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