Item #1940 [FIRST TRANSLATION OF SHAKESPEARE'S SONNETS] Literaturno-naukovyi vistnyk. Rychnyk X. Tom XXXVII. [i.e. Literary and Scientific Herald. Year X. Vol XXXVII]. M. Hrushevs'kyi.
[FIRST TRANSLATION OF SHAKESPEARE'S SONNETS] Literaturno-naukovyi vistnyk. Rychnyk X. Tom XXXVII. [i.e. Literary and Scientific Herald. Year X. Vol XXXVII]
[FIRST TRANSLATION OF SHAKESPEARE'S SONNETS] Literaturno-naukovyi vistnyk. Rychnyk X. Tom XXXVII. [i.e. Literary and Scientific Herald. Year X. Vol XXXVII]
[FIRST TRANSLATION OF SHAKESPEARE'S SONNETS] Literaturno-naukovyi vistnyk. Rychnyk X. Tom XXXVII. [i.e. Literary and Scientific Herald. Year X. Vol XXXVII]
[FIRST TRANSLATION OF SHAKESPEARE'S SONNETS] Literaturno-naukovyi vistnyk. Rychnyk X. Tom XXXVII. [i.e. Literary and Scientific Herald. Year X. Vol XXXVII]
[FIRST TRANSLATION OF SHAKESPEARE'S SONNETS] Literaturno-naukovyi vistnyk. Rychnyk X. Tom XXXVII. [i.e. Literary and Scientific Herald. Year X. Vol XXXVII]
[FIRST TRANSLATION OF SHAKESPEARE'S SONNETS] Literaturno-naukovyi vistnyk. Rychnyk X. Tom XXXVII. [i.e. Literary and Scientific Herald. Year X. Vol XXXVII]

[FIRST TRANSLATION OF SHAKESPEARE'S SONNETS] Literaturno-naukovyi vistnyk. Rychnyk X. Tom XXXVII. [i.e. Literary and Scientific Herald. Year X. Vol XXXVII]

[Kyiv]: 1907. Item #1940

[4], 570, [2] pp. 24 x 16.5 cm. Contemporary quarter leather. Embossed gilt spine. In Ukrainian. Overall good condition. Damp stain to the upper part of the front and back boards. Wear of the spine. Owner’s marks on the title: Iliaryi Karbulyts'kyi’ owner’s mark in ink and stamp on the title, also later illegible owner’s mark in pen from 1961. Lacking list with pages 495-496. A couple of pencil and ink marks in text. Margin tear to p. 341.

Vistnyk first appeared as a Galician monthly, printed in Lviv, in 1898. Aimed at intellectuals of the era, it formed the minds of the first broad generation of Ukrainophiles, an opposition to Mosvophiles. Providing more serious than a daily agenda of the newspapers, revue-like studies, Vistnyk proved itself as a basis to form the core of Ukrainian national self-identification. Est. run was ca. 1000 copies.
This volume marks a very important change, the beginning of what is recognised as the second phase of Vistnyk existence. As stated in the appeal to the readers, this is the first volume to be printed and distributed not only in the Western, but also in Russian, Eastern Ukraine. This change was possible due to the fall of the Russian censorship and thus an opportunity to access a broader reader’s base. A louder voice was welcomed by the nacio-centric will of the editorial staff that and by the readers who were deeply moved by the idea to unite ethnic Ukrainian lands. The edition was so important that the publishers of similar Nova hromada (issued during 1906) revue agreed to close the magazine just to not create unneeded competition for Vistnyk. Kyiv era of Vistnyk continued till 1914 when the imperial reaction banned the distribution of the publication. Although early issues were compiled and edited by genius Ivan Franko (1856-1916), the key figure, who also was editor of this and subsequent issues, was Mykhailo Hrushevs'kyi (1866-1934). Hrushevs'kyi was probably the single most active and important figure of national Ukrainian revival of late 19th -early 20th century period. As a scientist, he is known for his monumental Istoriia Ukrainy-Rusy [i.e. History of Ukraine-Rus'] in 10 vols., a study where for the first time from a historical, factual point of view the difference between Russia and Ukraine as countries was shown. As a politician, his impeccable reputation brought him to become the 1st head of parliament of the short-lived Ukrainian People's Republic. Hrushevs'kyi led the creation of the first Ukrainian constitution. In the Vistnyk publications Hrushevs'kyi mostly refrained from political debates and never sided with any party but stayed loyal to the idea of saving national identity.

The issue is divided into three parts: poetry, prose, literature & science. Poetry is further divided into Ukrainian where authors like Mykhailo Staryts'kyi (1840-1904), Mykola Cherniavs'kyi (1868-1938), Pylyp Kapel'horods'kyi (1882-1938) can be found. Among foreign poetry, a small selection of Shakesperian sonnets translated by Ivan Franko himself can be found. Some researchers state that Franko knew as much as 14 languages and of course he was translating most Western European authors directly from the original text. Franko placed Shakespeare above most of the authors he translated and thought that classic translations are a challenge for the Ukrainian language itself. Franko studied Shakespeare as closely as he studied T. Shevchenko. He translated The Merchant of Venice, at least 12 sonnets and did a work to revise and publish a number of earlier translations made by P. Kulish (1819-1897). This is one of three known lifetime publications of Shakespearian sonnets translated by Franko. Pp. 116-117 feature: XXIX “When, in disgrace with fortune and men’s eyes…”, XXX “When to the sessions of sweet silent thought…” and XLVI “Mine eye and heart are at a mortal war…” Franko changes iambic pentameter to a 11-13 syllable verse but manages to save the structure of 14 lines with three quatrains and a couplet. Franko also sometimes changes the rhyming scheme, for example for the sonnet XXIX he uses abab cddc efef gg instead of the original abab cdcd efef gg.
Franko’s translations of sonnets were first lyrical translations of Shakespeare in Ukrainian ever and this volume features the first appearance in print of those three translations.
Prosaic works are also divided into original Ukrainian texts and translated ones. While translations are of minor importance and can be noted only as exercises in flexibility of the Ukrainian language, original texts show an existing diversity of literary genres. A tale by future Ukrainian prime minister Volodymyr Vynnychenko (1880-1951), a romanticist love story by Denys Lukiyanovych (1873-1965) are published side by side with some village memoirs. Three short stories, including a realistic one by Danylo Kharoviuk (1883-1916), are marked as written in Ukrainian dialects.
Both poetic and prosaic sections feature women writers like Khrystyna Alchevs'ka (1882-1931), Nadiia Kybal'chych (1878-1914), Marusia Volevachivna and M. Symonivna.
The third part, on science and literature, consist mainly of articles by Mykhailo Hrushevs'kyi and Ivan Franko themselves. Those articles are biographies, notes on Ukrainica in general, something that can be described as political editorials and language-centred articles.
As by 1907 the majority of strictly scientific articles was published in Naukovoe tovarystvo ym. Shevchenka separate editions, this third part of Vistnyk should be addressed as journalistics.
Hrushevs'kyi as a journalist publishes here 3 of his several dozen articles from the Na ukrains'ki temy series: a collection of reflections on Ukrainian national identity. Mykhailo Lozyns'kyi (1880-1937) and Fedir Matushevs'kyy (1869-1919) present political analysis: overview of social and political events on Western Ukraine and review of current Russian news respectively. Important is Ivan Franko’s Svoboda y avtonomiia [i.e. Freedom and Autonomy] essay explaining that human rights and the European principle of equality of all before the law should be the basis of national autonomy. The article, though a short one, basically sums up the political views of the Vistnyk editors: Ukrainians are a united nation that should live by European standards.
Past owner of the book, Iliaryi Karbulyts'kyi (1880-1961) was a noted Bukovina teacher, publisher, writer and a member of parliament of Western Ukrainian People’s Republic.

Rare. This issue of Vistnyk is not in WorldCat not in KVK.

Price: $2,500.00

See all items in Ukraine, Ukrainian Translation
See all items by