Item #1975 [RUSSIAN DADA] Trudy tvorcheskogo biuro Nichevokov [i.e. Proceedings of Creative Bureau of the Nothingers]. Issue 1
[RUSSIAN DADA] Trudy tvorcheskogo biuro Nichevokov [i.e. Proceedings of Creative Bureau of the Nothingers]. Issue 1
[RUSSIAN DADA] Trudy tvorcheskogo biuro Nichevokov [i.e. Proceedings of Creative Bureau of the Nothingers]. Issue 1
[RUSSIAN DADA] Trudy tvorcheskogo biuro Nichevokov [i.e. Proceedings of Creative Bureau of the Nothingers]. Issue 1

[RUSSIAN DADA] Trudy tvorcheskogo biuro Nichevokov [i.e. Proceedings of Creative Bureau of the Nothingers]. Issue 1

Item #1975

Moscow: KHOBO, 1922. 14, [2] pp. 24,3x16,2 cm. In original constructivist wrappers with linocut publisher’s mark. Spine, cover edges and page corners restored, some soiling, otherwise very good. Second edition. One of 300 copies according to the back cover, or one of 500 copies, according to the rear side of the title page.

A unique publication consisting entirely of manifesto-decrees of an obviously parodic nature compiled by the Russian dada group. One of the most scandalous literary associations of the 1920s, Nichevoki [the Nothingers] surpassed in this regard even the Imaginists and early Cubo-Futurists. The group “Nichevoki” was founded in Moscow in early 1920 and took shape in Rostov-on-Don in August 1920. The group existed for a little more than two years, being a Russian echo of European Dadaism. Among its members were Susanna Mar, Elena Nikolaeva, Aetsii Ranov, Rurik Rok, Boris Zemenkov, Sergei Sadikov and others. Rostov poet Vladimir Filov and representative of the Tiflis publishing house “Khobo” in Moscow, Movses Agababov were associated and collaborated with the group. It ceased to exist after Rok was arrested for falsification, Ranov and Nikolaeva were arrested for relations with counter-revolutionaries and Sadikov died under a tram.
The Nothingers managed to publish two thin almanacs: ‘A Reading From Nothingers To You’ (1920) and ‘Dog Box, or Proceedings of Creative Bureau of Nichevoki’ (in two editions of 1921 and
1922).

The Nothingers were similar to Imaginism and had an extremely bad attitude towards Acmeism and Futurism. Nichevoki became known widely on January 19, 1922, when they interrupted futurists’ purges of poetry. They strongly recommended Mayakovsky to clean the boots of passers-by on Tverskoy Boulevard. They regularly attacked Mayakovsky, subjected him to trial in absentia by their “Revolutionary Tribunal” and ‘banned’ him from writing. The start of their public activity was combined with another mess. In August 1920, “Decree about Nothingers of Poetry” was posted in the window of the Rostov Union of Poets, calling on not to write anything, not to read anything, not to say anything, not to print anything.

The action caused confusion: the crowd surrounding the window mocked the Nichevoks [and indirectly Red Army soldiers]. Finally, some soldiers took the jesters to a police station, to the
great joy of the Nothingers. This “simple manual for Nothingism” came out on April 1, 1922 presenting manifestos “Decree on the Separation of the Art from the State”, “From Nichevoki of Russia to Dada of the West”, “Decree about Nothingers of Poetry”, “Decree on Painting”, etc. Also, other statements of the members are published. In particular, Susanna Mar officially
asked to exclude her from the group because she had chosen Imaginism. Her note is followed by a petition of her spouse R. Rok asking for divorce.

The edition was designed by Boris Zemenkov (1902-1963). At that time, he was a VKHUTEMAS student tending to the modernist movements in poetry and art. In this imprint, he was considered “Wise in Expressionism” and “Extraordinary Nichevok of Painting”. As an artist, he worked a lot in the genre of urban landscape, for instance, he created a series of sketches of memorable literary houses in the form that they had when one or another writer lived in them. Later Zemenkov became a well-known historian of Moscow city. He also published numerous essays on Moscow streets. The brochure contains advertisements for the next (unpublished) issue 2 “Nothing-2”, as well as individual publications of the members.

No copies of this edition found in Worldcat.

Price: $3,500.00

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