Item #1984 [VKHUTEMAS] Zheleznaia doroga [i.e. The Railroad] / [edited by Samuil Marshak]. Viktor Schepotev.
[VKHUTEMAS] Zheleznaia doroga [i.e. The Railroad] / [edited by Samuil Marshak]
[VKHUTEMAS] Zheleznaia doroga [i.e. The Railroad] / [edited by Samuil Marshak]
[VKHUTEMAS] Zheleznaia doroga [i.e. The Railroad] / [edited by Samuil Marshak]
[VKHUTEMAS] Zheleznaia doroga [i.e. The Railroad] / [edited by Samuil Marshak]
[VKHUTEMAS] Zheleznaia doroga [i.e. The Railroad] / [edited by Samuil Marshak]
[VKHUTEMAS] Zheleznaia doroga [i.e. The Railroad] / [edited by Samuil Marshak]
[VKHUTEMAS] Zheleznaia doroga [i.e. The Railroad] / [edited by Samuil Marshak]

[VKHUTEMAS] Zheleznaia doroga [i.e. The Railroad] / [edited by Samuil Marshak]

Item #1984

Moscow; Leningrad: GIZ, 1930. 16 pp., including the wrappers. 16x13 cm. Original chromolithographed wrappers. Spine is slightly chipped, otherwise very good.
First and only edition.

Klavdia Afanasyevna Kozlova (1902-1966) received her education at Moscow VKHUTEMAS. Subsequently, she, along with a cohort of fellow graduates, became a part of the OST (Society of Easel Artists), which was established under the leadership of David Shtenberg. The OST artists were in opposition to AHRR (Association of Artists of Revolutionary Russia), which actively combated "formalism" while upholding the traditions of the Russian avant-garde. In contrast, the OST members, influenced by avant-garde artists and departing from pre-revolutionary realism, gravitated towards social realism in painting, incorporating techniques from European expressionism. Kozlova's artistic output deeply embraced the principles of the OST movement, and she was a member of the Isobrigade group from 1931 to 1932. Led by A.A. Deineka, as part of a brigade of artists – fellow OST members (E.S. Zernova, V.I. Lyushin, E.K. Melnikova), participated in the creation of a three-color “Poster ABC Book” for lacemakers of the Vologda region. The book is written by Viktor Schepotev (1908-1985) – a young Ukrainian author from Dnepropetrovsk (now – Dnipro), who published his first two books in 1930, both edited by Samuil Marshak. Interestingly, in the 1920s he studied in the railroad college, but dropped out, deciding to dedicate his life to writing. Later in life he was better known for translating Chechen literature, and cowriting the novel ‘Gibel Vendetty. Vainakhskaia povest’ with Chechen authors Mamakaev and
Oshaev, that became the classical text of Soviet Chechen literature.

This book falls into the large category of Soviet children’s books, dedicated to Soviet railroads. In late 1920s-early 1930s the railroad construction in the USSR was at its peak – for example, by 1930 the Turkestan-Siberian railroad was finished, which linked Soviet Asia with the European part of the country. The text of the book is dedicated to a group of children that decided to construct their own railroad, within one communal apartment, and for that purpose they formed a brigade, started to work in shifts and in the end got the job done. In Schepotev’s verse the world of the main hero Petya is skillfully interchange with the real world, and by the end of the narrative it seems that although the children were constructing the toy railroad, the actual operational railroad was complete, and Petya has been chosen to become the first engine driver.

Rare. Copies located at University of Chicago, McGill University Library and Princeton University Library.

Price: $2,750.00

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