Item #1992 [DEBUT OF UNCLE TOM’S CABIN IN RUSSIA] Khizhina diadi Toma, ili Zhizn’ negrov v nevol’nich’ikh shtatakh Severnoi Ameriki [i.e. Uncle Tom’s Cabin, or Black Life in Slave States of North America]. H. Beecher Stowe.
[DEBUT OF UNCLE TOM’S CABIN IN RUSSIA] Khizhina diadi Toma, ili Zhizn’ negrov v nevol’nich’ikh shtatakh Severnoi Ameriki [i.e. Uncle Tom’s Cabin, or Black Life in Slave States of North America]
[DEBUT OF UNCLE TOM’S CABIN IN RUSSIA] Khizhina diadi Toma, ili Zhizn’ negrov v nevol’nich’ikh shtatakh Severnoi Ameriki [i.e. Uncle Tom’s Cabin, or Black Life in Slave States of North America]

[DEBUT OF UNCLE TOM’S CABIN IN RUSSIA] Khizhina diadi Toma, ili Zhizn’ negrov v nevol’nich’ikh shtatakh Severnoi Ameriki [i.e. Uncle Tom’s Cabin, or Black Life in Slave States of North America]

Item #1992

Moscow: V tipografii Katkova i Ko, 1857. 434 pp. 23x15,5 cm. In modern half-leather with gilt lettering. Stains occasionally, title page repaired along spine, private library
stamps, otherwise very good.

First Russian publication of the legendary antislavery novel appeared in the magazine “Russkii Vestnik”. Very rare. When it was first published in English in 1852, Russia was still ruled by Nicholas I, who introduced the Censorship Statute in 1826. Its modified version continued to be in effect in 1828-1857. According to the Censorship Statute, works were subject to prohibition that contained “anything tending to undermine the teachings of the Orthodox Greek-Russian Church, its traditions and rituals, or in general the truths and dogmas of the Christian faith,” as well as “anything violating the inviolability of the supreme autocratic power, or respect for the Imperial House, and anything contrary to fundamental state regulations”. At that time, ‘Uncle Tom’s Cabin’ was banned in Russia immediately, for the idea of universal human
equality and undermining of religious ideals. In 1855, the emperor Nicolas I died and Alexander II succeeded him on the throne. Firstly, he focused on the Crimean war in which the country was engaged and then turned to domestic reforms. In 1857, the Censorship Code was introduced and the ban on ‘Uncle Tom’s Cabin’ was annulled.

The Russian translation of the novel first published in the magazine “Russkii Vestnik” [Russian Herald], November-December 1857 and January-April 1858. The owner of the Moscow University printing shop, Mikhail Katkov created this periodical in 1856. The most significant works of Russian literature of the mid- and late 19th century were first published in “Russkii Vestnik”, including “Anna Karenina”, “Crime and Punishment”, “Fathers and Sons”, etc. Following the first publication of ‘Uncle Tom’s
Cabin’, publisher M. Wolf printed a shortened adaptation of the Russian translation for children in 1857. Soon the reviews on the novel spread widely among the periodicals, starting with “Sovremennik” issued by N. Nekrasov.

Not found in Worldcat.

Price: $7,500.00

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