Item #2010 [MEMOIRS ABOUT VELIMIR KHLEBNIKOV] Vospominaniya o Velemire Khlebnikove [i.e. Memoirs about Velimir Khlebnikov]. D. Petrovsky.
[MEMOIRS ABOUT VELIMIR KHLEBNIKOV] Vospominaniya o Velemire Khlebnikove [i.e. Memoirs about Velimir Khlebnikov]

[MEMOIRS ABOUT VELIMIR KHLEBNIKOV] Vospominaniya o Velemire Khlebnikove [i.e. Memoirs about Velimir Khlebnikov]

Item #2010

Moscow: Ogonek, 1926. 48 pp. 15x11.5 cm. In original publisher’s illustrated wrappers. Soiling of the front wrapper, mild damp stain in the upper right and lower corners throughout the
copy, otherwise in a very good condition.

Scarce. First edition. Front wrapper with Velimir Khlebnikov’s black-and-white portrait.
The reminiscences of the Ukrainian poet and member of the LEF group Dmitry Petrovsky (1892-1955) about the years of his close friendship with Velimir Khlebnikov (1885-1922). The book came out as part of the series “The Library of Ogonyok” in 1926, four years after Khlebnikov’s tragic death. Foreword by Russian and Soviet literary theorist, critic, writer, and pamphleteer Viktor Shklovsky (1893-1984). The author opens his memoirs in 1916 with the scene of his initial encounter with the “puma:” “I met Velimir Khlebnikov unexpectedly, although I had known and loved him for two years before. I also knew that we would definitely meet, and therefore did not make any effort to do so.” Throughout the narrative, Petrovsky
intricately recounts their wanderings, financial struggles, and private conversations. Particularly intriguing are the unknown moments of “mishaps from their life together”: “Khlebnikov stood near the sink and slapped his lips with his free hand, puffing out his cheeks. The result was a sound like a failed firecracker. Ten, twenty, thirty minutes passed, he still stood and moved his strangely mobile eyebrows on his huge forehead.” Another fascinating episode details their search for a gypsy camp, where Khlebnikov fell in love with a French gypsy and
found himself embroiled in a skirmish with armed men. In the text, Petrovsky emphasizes Khlebnikov’s emotional identification with the Soviet power, noting that Khlebnikov “was very interested in my participation in the Revolution, and asked me about the life of the guerrillas . . . And he himself dreamt of taking an active part in the Revolution. 1 knew, of course, that it would never happen. He was too absent-minded, contemplative, and focused on himself.” Throughout the rest of the memoirs, the author recalls captivating moments from their
collaboration on the “table of noises,” the Bubnovy Valet exhibition, a futurist event featuring Khlebnikov and Tatlin, etc.

Worldcat shows 2 copies of the edition at New York Public Library System and University of California.

Status: On Hold
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