Item #2025 [THE SONG OF HIAWATHA IN UKRAINIAN] Pisnya pro Hayavatu [i.e. The Song of Hiawatha]. H. Longfellow.
[THE SONG OF HIAWATHA IN UKRAINIAN] Pisnya pro Hayavatu [i.e. The Song of Hiawatha]
[THE SONG OF HIAWATHA IN UKRAINIAN] Pisnya pro Hayavatu [i.e. The Song of Hiawatha]
[THE SONG OF HIAWATHA IN UKRAINIAN] Pisnya pro Hayavatu [i.e. The Song of Hiawatha]
[THE SONG OF HIAWATHA IN UKRAINIAN] Pisnya pro Hayavatu [i.e. The Song of Hiawatha]
[THE SONG OF HIAWATHA IN UKRAINIAN] Pisnya pro Hayavatu [i.e. The Song of Hiawatha]

[THE SONG OF HIAWATHA IN UKRAINIAN] Pisnya pro Hayavatu [i.e. The Song of Hiawatha]

Item #2025

Kharkiv: Derzh. vid-vo Ukr., 1923. [4], V, [1], 250 pp., 23 ill., frontispiece: ill. 23x14.9 cm. In original publisher’s illustrated wrappers. Neat restoration of the
spine, a small hole on the p. 178 (no text affected), otherwise in a very good condition.

First separate edition. 1 of 5,000 copies. Translated from Russian. Text in Ukrainian. Front wrapper design by the prominent Ukrainian Soviet graphic artist, poster designer, and sculptor Adolf Strakhov (1896-1979). After graduating from the Odessa Art School in 1915, Strakhov worked as an artist for newspapers “Zvezda,” “Donetsk Communist,” and “Selskaya Pravda.” Simultaneously, he began working in book graphics, illustrating works by T. Shevchenko, F. Dostoevsky, L. Tolstoy, S. Stepnyak-Kravchinsky, A. Kuprin, M. Twain, etc. Some of his most famous works include “Ten Days That Shook the World” by J. Reed (1923), “Stenka Razin” by V. Kamensky (1923), “Two Souls” by A. Novikov-Priboi (1925), and “The Sharp Turn” by P. Zhurba (1927). He was honored with the Grand Prix gold medal at the International Exhibition in Paris in 1925 for his outstanding achievements in book design. During the Great Patriotic War, Strakhov designed numerous political posters and even established a genre known as “Strakhov’s posters.”
With a frontispiece, 22 black-and-white plates, and numerous black-and-white illustrations from Bunin’s 1903 Russian edition of the novel.
The second Ukrainian translation of Longfellow’s The Song of Hiawatha by the prominent Ukrainian writer and poet Oleksandr Oles (1878-1944). Oles rendered the novel into Ukrainian in 1912, publishing it on the pages of the Literaturno-nauchnyy vestnik [i.e. Literary and Scientific Bulletin] later the same year. Lacking proficiency in English and French, he based his Ukrainian rendition on Bunin’s Russian translation. The first separate edition of Oles’s translation came out in Kharkiv in 1923, during the translator’s emigration years in Vienna. Oleksandr Oles, originally known as Kandyba, made his literary debut in the almanac Koster [i.e. Bonfire] in 1905. His first book of poetry was sponsored for publication under the pseudonym Oleksandr Oles in
1907. Initially residing in Kharkiv, he later emigrated in 1919, serving as a cultural attaché for the embassy of the Ukrainian People’s Republic in Hungary during the October Revolution and the Civil War. Oles then relocated to Vienna in 1920, where he assumed leadership of the Union of Ukrainian Journalists and edited the magazine Na perelomi [i.e. At the Turning Point]. Subsequently, he moved to Prague in 1924. Oles authored several poetry collections abroad, with a predominant theme centered on yearning for Ukraine.

Worldcat shows 2 copies of the edition at the New York Public Library and Harvard University.

Price: $1,250.00

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