Item #2028 [ATATURK’S MEMOIRS IN RUSSIAN] Vospominaniya prezidenta Turetskoy respubliki [i.e. Memoirs of the President of the Turkish Republic]. M. Kemal Ataturk.
[ATATURK’S MEMOIRS IN RUSSIAN] Vospominaniya prezidenta Turetskoy respubliki [i.e. Memoirs of the President of the Turkish Republic].

[ATATURK’S MEMOIRS IN RUSSIAN] Vospominaniya prezidenta Turetskoy respubliki [i.e. Memoirs of the President of the Turkish Republic].

Item #2028

Moscow: akts. izd. o-vo “Ogonek”, 1927 (“Mospoligraf”. Tipo-tsinkografiya “Mysl’ pechatnika”). 64 pp. 14.4x11.4 cm. In original publisher’s illustrated wrappers. Very light damp stain in the upper and lower left corners throughout the copy, pen marking on the front wrapper, otherwise in a very good condition.

Scarce. First separate edition. First appeared in Russian print in the Krasnaya Nov’ magazine in 1926. Abridged translation and notes by N. Ravich. Lifetime edition. Original published in the early-1920s.
The reminiscences of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk (1881-1938), the founding father of the Republic of Turkey, about the years from the commencement of WWI to the signing of the Armistice of Mudros in the late 1918. The edition was published as part of the series “The Library of Ogonyok” in 1927 and was the first separate abridged Russian translation of Ataturk’s memoirs.
The book came out a few years before the period of amicable ties between Turkey and the Soviet Union came to an end. Following escalating tensions, Ataturk’s final text in Russian, as recorded in the Catalogue of the Russian Parliamentary Library, was published in 1934. Subsequently, no further texts in Russian by Ataturk were published until 1966.
Until the latter half of the 1930s, Soviet–Turkish relations were cordial and somewhat fraternal. At the request of Atatürk, Lenin provided crucial military and financial aid to the Turkish National Movement in its struggle against the Ottoman monarchy and Western occupiers. As a gesture of solidarity, the Russian SFSR formally recognized the Kemalist government in March 1921. Subsequent treaties, notably the Treaty of Moscow, further solidified the friendly ties between the two countries. Despite initial cooperation, tensions arose as Turkish authorities became wary of communism’s potential spread within their borders, fueled by rising communist ideology within Turkey. In response, Atatürk implemented measures such as banning the Turkish Communist Party and suppressing communist activities. These ideological differences strained Soviet-Turkish relations, leading to suspicion, and culminating in the Turkish Straits Crisis of 1936 (a territorial conflict between the Soviet Union and Turkey that ended with Status quo ante bellum).

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Price: $350.00

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