[FROM AGRARIAN COUNTRY TO INDUSTRIAL POWER] Chto i kak my stroim [i.e. What and How We Build]. B. Shakhmatov.
[FROM AGRARIAN COUNTRY TO INDUSTRIAL POWER] Chto i kak my stroim [i.e. What and How We Build]
[FROM AGRARIAN COUNTRY TO INDUSTRIAL POWER] Chto i kak my stroim [i.e. What and How We Build]
[FROM AGRARIAN COUNTRY TO INDUSTRIAL POWER] Chto i kak my stroim [i.e. What and How We Build]

[FROM AGRARIAN COUNTRY TO INDUSTRIAL POWER] Chto i kak my stroim [i.e. What and How We Build]

Item #468

Moscow; Leningrad: Gosizdat, 1930. 94, [2] pp.: ill. 20x14 cm. In original illustrated constructivist wrappers. Very good. Tears of the spine, small tear of the front wrapper, stain on the lower margin on the rear cover and throughout pages, last page slightly scuffed, private library ink stamp on p.2, 17, 95.

First and only edition. One of 10000 copies. Scarce.

This book was published on the third year of the first five year plan (economic goals set by Stalin in order to boost the economy). The central aspect of the first Soviet five-year plan was the rapid industrialization of the Soviet Union. To meet the unrealistic quotas for production set by the Soviet leaders, the facilities had to be constructed quickly to facilitate material production before goods could be produced. During this period 1928-1932, massive industrial centers emerged in areas that were highly isolated before. These isolated areas included Magnitogorsk, Dnieper, and Nizhny Novgorod. During this era of Soviet history heavy industry was supposed to experience a 350% increase in output. So this book in two parts was supposed to depict (or more like promote and boast) the results of first years. What they built were new coal mines, oil pipelines, chemical, electrical and metal factories, etc.

The main new factories were Magnitogorsky and Kuznetsky factories. Mechanical engineering got a big push as well. The second part describes financing (‘expected to spent 40 billions roubles’), pace, and problems of first years (like craftsmanship and lack of mass production - ‘our bricklayer lays 500 bricks a day while American bricklayer free from passing materials and other jobs except from bricklaying lays 2-3 thousands bricks in 8-hour workday’). Interested that author also dedicated a few pages to bring examples of successful American experience in construction.

Text with statistical data is accompanied by rare photographs of construction in process of factories, grain elevators, power stations. Overall an interesting account of achievements in Soviet industrial construction published like many other materials in order to boost proletariat spirits.

No copies in the Worldcat.

Price: $950.00

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