[BOOK DESIGN BY SOLOMON TELINGATER] Napostovsky svistok: Stikhi i epigrammy [i.e. Post Whistle: Poems and Epigrams]. S. A. Shvetsov.
[BOOK DESIGN BY SOLOMON TELINGATER] Napostovsky svistok: Stikhi i epigrammy [i.e. Post Whistle: Poems and Epigrams]
[BOOK DESIGN BY SOLOMON TELINGATER] Napostovsky svistok: Stikhi i epigrammy [i.e. Post Whistle: Poems and Epigrams]
[BOOK DESIGN BY SOLOMON TELINGATER] Napostovsky svistok: Stikhi i epigrammy [i.e. Post Whistle: Poems and Epigrams]
[BOOK DESIGN BY SOLOMON TELINGATER] Napostovsky svistok: Stikhi i epigrammy [i.e. Post Whistle: Poems and Epigrams]

[BOOK DESIGN BY SOLOMON TELINGATER] Napostovsky svistok: Stikhi i epigrammy [i.e. Post Whistle: Poems and Epigrams]

Moscow: Gosizdat, 1932. Item #500

[42] pp.: ill. 20x12 cm. In original illustrated cardboards. Very good, loss of the spine, covers rubbed, illustrated bookplate on the front pastedown (from the collection of O.S. Kuzmy).

First and only edition. One of 3000 copies. A rare poetry book by satire poet Sergei Shvetsov (1903-1969) with an extraordinary book design focused on cartoons by classic collective Kukryniksy as well as types, spaces and other polygraphic elements created by Solomon Telingater, Soviet constructivist designer and innovator who created some of the most memorable books of Soviet era. The pioneer in printing arts was El Lissitzky who saw the book as a visual object, but the widespread acceptance of these ideas did not occur until the turn of the 1920s and ‘30s as a result of the efforts of his young followers. First among them was Telingater. He designed books as if they were lms or monumental posters - sophisticated artistic constructions. Such books were produced primarily for its collective impact, not merely for the joy of the individual reader. His work is akin to the art of declamation: letters react to slightest uctuations of poetic intonation instantly changing the size or position on the page. All elements of the book, including the text itself, are connected as one visual art object which makes a very strong impression on its readers.

This is the second book of the young poet and in 1932 Gorky came across it and noted it in a letter to M. Koltsov. Koltsov then engaged in the organization of the magazine Za rubezhom [i.e.‘Abroad’] and Gorky advised him to create there a department like ‘‘Whistle’’ and invite Shvetsov, M. Zoshchenko, Y, Olesha and others to participate. Whether Koltsov proposed to Shvetsov work in a new journal is not known, but soon Shvetsov became the head of the poetry department of the rst major monthly magazine ‘Krasnaya Nov’, where he worked until it was closed in 1942.

Worldcat locates copies in Columbia, Stanford and University of North Carolina.

Price: $750.00

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